Thank you for joining us for the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse’s inaugural annual Policy Symposium, titled ‘Extinction thwarted? The nexus between climate change, social equity and health’.  

Humanity faces three major and interconnected challenges – climate change, social inequality and premature death and disease. Governance approaches to date have failed to address these problems, and in many cases have made the situation worse by approaching these issues and their common drivers in isolation from each other. For a governance response to be commensurate with the challenges faced by society, a more holistic approach is needed that brings disciplines and sectors together, and recognises the importance of addressing the common structural drivers of planetary health inequity. 

Hosted by Prof Sharon Friel, Director of the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse, with opening remarks from ANU Vice-Chancellor, Professor Brian P. Schmidt AC, and the Honourable Ged Kearney MPattendees heard government, non-government and academic experts discuss the political, economic, and social dimensions of planetary health equity. Throughout the day we explored the role of different economic models, power in policy systems, and opportunities offered by optimising climate change mitigation policies for social and health goals.

The aim of the day was not to simply describe the problem but to identify the conditions that can enable the transformation of the system towards the promotion of the equitable enjoyment of good health for all within the context of a stable, sustainable ecosystem, and shift governance practices toward a more effective modern paradigm. The symposium comprises four consecutive sessions: Setting the Scene; Follow the Money; Advancing Progressive Policy, and Thwarting Extinction: Making it Happen.

Program

The full program, including speakers and agenda, is available here

 

Registrations for this event are now closed.

 

Getting to the venue

In the spirit of the event and Hothouse, we encourage you to use active and/or public transport. Car parking on ANU campus is quite limited. You can find further information about transport and parking on the university's website, and below. 

Walking Alinga to venue

Walking from Civic (Canberra CBD)

It is about 2kms from the Alinga St tram stop (Civic) to the venue. Allocate about 40-45 minutes for the walk and to settle into your seat before the starting time of 9:15am.

People riding bicycles
@CanberraByBike @parislord

Cycling

If you come by bicycle, there is plenty of bike parking at the entrance to the building (as well as a water bubbler).

Statue positioned as if riding a scooter

E-scooters

E-scooters are available through Beam Mobility and Neuron Mobility and are an efficient way to get from the uni’s surrounds to the venue. If you’re new to e-scooters and/or from outside of Canberra, make sure you’ve downloaded the apps first.

Toy car with Lego people as passengers

Driving

If you do need to drive, we encourage you to carpool. Visitors are able to park in Pay As You Go parking zones and Pay & Display zones after paying the appropriate fee to do so. There are a limited number of time limited parking bays at no charge. More information on PAYG.

Parking fees.

Map of visitors parking options.

The Planetary Health Equity Hothouse is the centrepiece of the Australian Research Council Laureate Fellowship in Governance for Planetary Health Equity, housed in the School of Regulation and Global Governance at the Australian National University.

Read here to find out more about our work. 

 

We are delighted to announce the inaugural Planetary Health Equity Future Leaders program. The Planetary Health Equity Hothouse will welcome a small group of early career researchers and PhD students to join us in Canberra in September 2023.

The thematic focus of the 2023 Planetary Health Equity Future Leaders program is “structural drivers of planetary health inequity”. Through an intensive fortnight of structured workshops and masterclasses related to theory, transdisciplinary research, and knowledge mobilisation, plus time for writing and conversations with the Hothouse team members and wider ANU community, the program offers an opportunity to develop new research skills, spark new collaborative ideas, and create new opportunities for knowledge mobilisation that aims to improve planetary health equity. The Future Leaders program will also involve interaction with the Hothouse 2023 Distinguished Visitor Thinker in Residence and participation in the Hothouse’s Annual Governance for Planetary Health Equity Policy Symposium, where the Hothouse research will be presented alongside insights from policy makers, NGOs, and business groups, including members of the Hothouse Advisory Board.

The program is open to early career researchers and PhD students at institutions across Australia and globally. The selected candidates will join the Hothouse between 4th-15th September 2023. Participants are welcome to remain at the Hothouse to think, write, and discuss for up to 13th of October.

Stay tuned to hear about the program, and the 2023 participants.

We are very excited to announce the second Planetary Health Equity Future Leaders program. The Planetary Health Equity Hothouse will welcome a small group of early career researchers and PhD students to join us in Canberra in September 2024.

The thematic focus of the 2024 Planetary Health Equity Future Leaders program is “Addressing the structural drivers of planetary health inequity”. Through an intensive fortnight of structured workshops and masterclasses related to theory, transdisciplinary research, and knowledge mobilisation, plus time for writing and conversations with the Hothouse team members and wider ANU community, the program offers an opportunity to develop new research skills, spark new collaborative ideas, and create new opportunities for knowledge mobilisation that aims to improve planetary health equity. 

The program is open to early career researchers and PhD students at institutions across Australia and globally. The selected candidates will join the Hothouse between 2nd-13th September 2024. Participants are welcome to remain at the Hothouse to think, write, and discuss until 27th of September.

The Future Leaders Program explained

In this video, Sharon Friel, Director of the Hothouse, research fellows and 2023 program participants give an overview of the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse Future Leaders Program.

Testimonials from 2023 Future Leader Fellows

In this video, some of the participants in the 2023 Future Leaders Program reflect on their experiences of the program.  

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode features Katherine Trebeck, a political economist, writer and advocate for economic system change. She co-founded the Wellbeing Economy Alliance and also WEAll Scotland, its Scottish hub.

This webinar reflects on the idea of a wellbeing economy: one that puts people and planet first. It will explore how this concept has risen in prominence in recent years and what it means in practice. It lays out some of the next steps that are needed to build a wellbeing economy and what different sectors need to do to play their part.

Event Speakers

Photo of Katherine Trebeck

Katherine Trebeck

Katherine is a political economist, writer and advocate for economic system change. She co-founded the Wellbeing Economy Alliance and WEAll Scotland, its Scottish hub. She is writer-in-residence at the University of Edinburgh’s Edinburgh Futures Institute and has roles advising the Club of Rome and Australia's Centre for Policy Development and The Next Economy.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode features Carl Rhodes, Dean and Professor of Organization Studies at the University of Technology Sydney Business School.

Economic inequality is a growing scourge on today’s world. At the apex of this massively unfair system are the global billionaires – an ultra-elite social class who have sequestered the world’s wealth while others languish in poverty and hunger. The immense social and political power billionaires possess cannot be explained by their wealth alone. Coupled with the financial resources billionaires command is a set of inter-connected myths that portray them as a ‘force for good’. This webinar reviews the myths of the good billionaire and how they serve to vanquish the democratic promise of shared prosperity and human flourishing. The webinar also discusses how undermining the myth can lead to a new moral and political vision for a future where the wealth created by human activity is shared by the many rather than hoarded by the few.

Event Speakers

Nick Frank

Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.

Transforming our economies to serve people and the planet is the big challenge of our time. However, there is no alternative, we need to move away from the current unhealthy and unjust economic practices that are harming the Earth’s ecosystems, which include all of us. Taking the lead to drive this necessary change is something that many are doing all around the world. 

On November 8, join the 2023 Fellows of the Future Leaders Program of the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in an open conversation with external guests to talk about why this economic transformation is so pivotal to achieve Planetary Health Equity and where they see their contribution.  

No matter their area of expertise, from food and urban development to gender and climate, they are all working with the same vision in mind: a healthy planet where all people today and tomorrow can live and thrive. Are you working on a similar path or simply curious to learn more? Would you like to share your point of view and experience or simply just listen? Then join us!

This is an event part of Earth4All Action Week 2023.

Event Speakers

Amy Carrad

Amy Carrad

Amy Carrad is a Research Fellow within the ANU’s School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to joining ANU, Amy worked on an Australian Research Council-funded project exploring the role of Australian local governments and civil society organisations in food system governance. She is particularly passionate about food systems, which also leads her advocacy work outside ANU.

Hridesh Gajurel

Hridesh Gajurel

Hridesh is a political economist specialising in comparative capitalism, financialisation, corporate short-termism, and institutional theory. He is currently a Postdoctoral Researcher in public policy based in Nepal and was previously a Lecturer in Political Science and International Relations at the University of Queensland.

Sandra Samantela

Sandra Samantela

Sandra is an environmental planner and assistant professor in the Department of Community and Environmental Resource Planning, University of the Philippines Los Baños where she teaches courses in human settlements/environmental planning and human ecology. Her research interests include climate and disaster vulnerability, urban land governance, and local development planning.

 

Steven Lade

Steven Lade

Dr Steven Lade is an ARC Future Fellow at the Fenner School of Environment & Society. He takes a systems approach to sustainability, working with the resilience and planetary boundary concepts across a variety of cases.

Betty Barkha

Betty Barkha

Dr Betty Barkha brings over a decade of experience in research, advocacy and business development across the Pacific and Asia. Betty's PhD focused on examining the Gendered impacts of Climate Change-Induced Displacement and Planned Relocation in Fiji, which has since informed the development of Pacific Regional Framework on Climate Mobility.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

In the first webinar of the series in 2024, Dr Nick Frank, Dr Megan Arthur and Prof Sharon Friel from the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse will discuss the big policy and business challenges for planetary health equity. Specifically they will explore issues related to the political economy, financialisation, and governance coherence.

Please join us for episode 9 by registering at the link above.

Event Speakers

Nicholas Frank

Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

Episode 10 features Jess Beagley, the Policy Lead at The Global Health and Climate Alliance, with Dr Megan Arthur and Prof. Sharon Friel.

COP28 in Dubai saw a record number of fossil fuel lobbyists at the heart of the international climate negotiations, while communities whose health and lives are most affected by planetary crises were severely under-represented. These imbalances in power were traceable in the decisions which emerged, which fell short of the commitments needed to protect the health of people and planet.

Meanwhile, health considerations, including those relating to air quality, are also often not deeply integrated into climate plans at country level. However, we can hope to see ambitious climate policy making to protect wellbeing through: improved representation of vulnerable communities and their priorities in policy fora, collaboration and strengthened messaging by civil society, cooperation across national Ministries responsible for planetary health issues, and regulation of industry participation.

The Saving the World Webinar Series is presented by the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse, the series discusses the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

Event Speakers

Photo of Jess, smiling.

Jess Beagley

Jess leads GCHA’s policy work, including raising the profile of health in UNFCCC negotiations, assessing Nationally Determined Contributions as key components of a healthy and sustainable recovery, working with national partners on local policy processes, and research and analysis. She has a background in public health and environmental determinants.

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur

Dr Megan Arthur is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Prof Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

In this episode, Sharon Friel, Megan Arthur and Nick Frank, will discuss the problem of the global consumptogenic system that generates intersecting climate change, social inequity, and health inequity crises, while drawing on emerging work from the ARC Laureate Fellowship Planetary Health Equity Hothouse.

In beginning to unpack the consumptogenic system that incentivises the excessive production and consumption of fossil fuel-reliant goods and services they will discuss ways in which the structure of global capitalism and different capitalist growth models undermine planetary health equity. They will also present a framework for pursuing governance for planetary health equity - and new lines of research that flow from this.

Event Speakers

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.
Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is a qualitative researcher interested in the governance of health and social policy, with a particular focus on non-state actor engagement and intersectoral policymaking.

Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

This session will shed some light on the dark world of intelligence agency powers and functions.

The work of Australia’s intelligence and security agencies largely occurs in secret. Yet, in a democracy underpinned by the rule of law, it is essential that the workings of government are transparent and accountable. A key part of balancing this apparent conflict is to place the powers and functions of intelligence and security agencies on a statutory footing.

In Australia this began in 1956 with the first Act governing the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO). That Act was 5 pages long. Today the laws governing the powers and functions of Australia’s six main intelligence and security agencies runs to around 1500 pages. The law in this area is complex and at times almost impenetrable. Moreover, changes in technology change the way these laws work in practice.

This presentation will provide a brief overview of the key powers and functions of Australia’s main intelligence agencies and will explore the way changing technology can affect statutory powers by looking at the history of ASIO’s power to intercept telephone services.

About the speaker

Jake Blight has been working in the field of National Security Law for over 20 years. This includes roles in the Australian Government Solicitor, as a General Counsel and as the Deputy and Acting Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security. He is currently an Associate Professor at the ANU National Security College. Jake has recently been appointed as Australia’s 5th Independent National Security Legislation Monitor – a role he will commence on 27 November 2023.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be dual-delivery.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Image of ‘top secret’ stamp by TayebMEZAHDIA on pixabay, free to use under pixabay licence

In the spotlight: the challenges for Counsel Assisting Royal Commissions involving high stakes policy and political issues.

Royal Commissions are a unique feature of Australian public life. In that context, the role of Counsel Assisting a Commission can be one of singular responsibility, pressure, and opportunity.

When politically charged or policy focussed, the work of assisting a Royal Commission or public inquiry requires a range of interdisciplinary skills and insights, beyond those within a traditional legal arsenal.

About the speaker

Dominique Hogan-Doran SC is a Senior Counsel of the Australian Bar. She was Senior Counsel Assisting the Commonwealth in the Royal Commission into the Robodebt Scheme (2022-2023), Senior Counsel Assisting the Royal Commission into National Natural Disaster Arrangements (2020) and Counsel Assisting the Special Commission of Inquiry into the James Hardie Group (2004). She has appeared as Counsel in a diverse range of public inquiries including into corruption, disability, aged care services, financial services misconduct, charitable fundraising, water regulation, greyhound racing, and the collapse of HIH Insurance Ltd. Dominique was previously an Associate Professor of Law contributing to the Centre for Law, Markets and Regulation at the University of New South Wales.

This seminar presentation will be online-only.

Image credit: Image of three Australian Government Royal Commission Report covers, © Commonwealth of Australia 2024, used under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licence

 


This episode has been postponed and will be rescheduled soon, please subscribe to our newsletter to be notified of the new date.


 

Episode 12 features Naomi Hogan, the Company Strategy Lead at ACCR, discussing how to influence fossil fuel companies. Naomi has experience in research, campaigns and advocacy, particularly on the impacts of coal and gas projects. Over the past 15 years, Naomi has worked with investors, companies, regional communities, Traditional Owners, scientists and policy makers towards enhanced climate disclosures and environmental protections.

The Saving the World Webinar Series is presented by the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse, the series discusses the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

Event Speakers

Naomi Hogan

Naomi Hogan

Naomi is the Company Strategy Lead at ACCR, bringing experience in research, campaigns and advocacy, particularly on the impacts of coal and gas projects. Naomi trained in science communication, climate science and natural resource management at the Australian National University. 

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Prof Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur

Dr Megan Arthur is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Episode 11 features Matt Castle, a Senior Lecturer in the Political Science and International Relations Program at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand whose current project explores how negotiators attempt to promote new norms in the trade regime, in the face of institutional and political constraints on innovation.

New global challenges demand new ideas. This is as true in the trade regime as in other areas of international cooperation. Yet by design and happenstance, existing rules and institutions are often resistant to change. Negotiators design global trade rules to provide a stable and predictable institutional environment, and these rules become ‘sticky’ over time. But faced with global challenges like climate change, new rules must emerge. How then do trade negotiators successfully promote new norms in a context that resists such innovation? I first examine the ways in which the trade regime has evolved into a ‘dense’ system of inter-related texts and discuss how this structure constrains the emergence of new ideas. I then look to opportunities for innovation and change. I focus on under-explored areas of the trade regime: agreement renegotiations, ‘side letters’, and ‘marginal’ agreements signed by small players.

The Saving the World Webinar Series is presented by the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse, the series discusses the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

Event Speakers

Photo of Matt Castle

Matthew Castle

Matthew Castle is a Senior Lecturer in the Political Science and International Relations Programme at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. His research and teaching examine issues in international and comparative political economy, with a particular interest in the politics of trade and trade agreements.

Nicholas Frank

Nicholas Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

Practitioner perspective insights on how the Global Compact for Migration is being utilised in practice to progress the rights of migrants at global, regional and national levels.

In recent years, the Global Compact for Migration (GCM) has emerged as the first intergovernmental UN agreement on a shared approach to global migration governance. Despite its limitations as a non-legally binding instrument, the GCM and its infrastructure have been used effectively to mobilise States around key migration issues. This presentation will share insights from a practitioner perspective on how the GCM is being utilised in practice to progress the rights of migrants at global, regional and national levels.

About the speaker

Dr Rasika Jayasuriya is a Visiting Fellow at RegNet, ANU. She has worked for over two decades across the government, multilateral and civil society sectors on policy issues related to migration and human rights. She has held positions as a Policy Specialist and Consultant with the Migration and Displacement team at UNICEF Headquarters and the UN Network on Migration at IOM-UN Migration in Geneva. She has also worked for the Australian Attorney-General’s Department on human trafficking and for the Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet on migration and refugee policy.

Rasika holds a PhD from the University of Melbourne’s Law School, focusing on temporary labour migration and child rights, and was a Doctoral Associate with the global ‘Gender, Migration and the Work of Care’ project at the Centre for Global Social Policy, University of Toronto. She is also a Member of the Gender and Care Hub at Oxford University.  

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be dual-delivery. Registration is only required for Zoom attendance; registration for in-person attendance is not required as neither the ANU nor ACT Health conduct contact tracing any longer.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Image of economy class rail passengers, Jakarta, by Aan Kasman from flickr (CC BY 2.0 DEED).

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode featured Dr Annabelle Workman, Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures.

The health and other impacts of climate change highlight an imperative for urgent climate action. The health community continues to increase its efforts in raising the alarm on climate-related health impacts and emphasising the health and economic benefits of ambitious and timely action. Yet, projections based on the analysis of current policies and action see us remain on a dangerous path of global warming over 2°C. Using insights from the political economy literature, this seminar will explore what strategies might exist to secure the urgent action needed to develop healthier climate policies.

Event Speakers

Photo of Annabelle, smiling.

Annabelle Workman

Belle is a social scientist driven by the urgent need to develop healthier climate policies. With a background in political science and public health, Belle is now a Research Fellow at Melbourne Climate Futures, co-leading the Health, Wellbeing and Climate Justice Research Program with Professor Kathryn Bowen.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels, with a particular interest in the social and environmental determinants of health equity.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode will feature Beck Pearse, a sociologist at the ANU School of Sociology and the Fenner School of Environment & Society.

Beck will discuss the social realities of Australia’s energy workforce and the resultant difficult questions about the political economy and geography of ‘just transition’ advocacy. Answers to questions about the where and who of transition management will be negotiated at multiple scales. The presentation will conclude with provisional thoughts on the institutions and reform strategies that will shape the future conditions, and therefore health, of energy labour.

Beck Pearse is a Lecturer jointly appointed to the ANU School of Sociology and Fenner School of Environment and Society. Beck’s current research projects investigate labour and land relations in the transition to a 'net zero' economy. She's interested in how people work and negotiate industrial change. Beck's doctoral thesis on the political economy of Australia’s emissions trading scheme was published as a monograph Pricing Carbon in Australia (Routledge/Earthscan, 2018). More recently, she co-authored Renewables and Rural Australia (2022) - the first social study of rural people's perspectives on the NSW Renewable Energy Zones.

Event Speakers

Photo of Rebecca Pearse

Beck Pearse

Beck Pearse is a sociologist at the ANU School of Sociology and the Fenner School of Environment & Society. Her teaching and research focuses on inequalities and environmental policy. Beck is interested in how people from different walks of life experience environmental change and how environmental policy can contribute to building a fair and ecologically abundant world.

Meg Arthur smiling in front of plants

Megan Arthur

Megan is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode will feature Hothouse Associate Fellow Christian Downie in discussion with Nick Frank and Sharon Friel:

The political activities of industries associated with the production and consumption of fossil fuels have thwarted state efforts to advance climate policy around the world. Yet we know very little about the role of trade associations that firms use to coordinate their activities. In this talk, Christian Downie from the Australian National University, follows the money to explore the political activities of trade associations in the United States between 2008 and 2018. Drawing on an original dataset built from tax filings, Christian will examine the revenue of these industry groups and their political spending. He will also draw on interviews with industry executives and lobbyists to discuss the political strategies trade associations use to shape climate policy.

Full recording available here on YouTube.

Event Speakers

Christian Downie is an Associate Professor in the School of Regulation and Global Governance at the Australian National University.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.
Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Dragonfly Thinking: how might we be able to use new AI tools and techniques to improve understandings of complex problems?

As part of the RegNet project on 'Governing in Complexity', Anthea Roberts and Miranda Forsyth have been developing a series of tools and techniques to help people better navigate complex issues. One technique that has been central to this project has been “dragonfly thinking,” which involves understanding complex phenomena by viewing them through a variety of lenses and integrating those perspectives into a more coherent vision.

In 2023, their group began experimenting with how to leverage generative AI to apply some of these techniques, creating a cyborg approach to “Think Tech” where humans co-create with AI tools. This led to the creation of a new ANU spin-out called Dragonfly Thinking, which was selected to take part in the 2024 CSIRO ON Accelerate program. In this seminar, Anthea and Miranda will walk through how this project has involved and where it might go next.

About the speakers

Anthea Roberts, a Professor at RegNet, is an interdisciplinary researcher and legal scholar who focuses on new ways of thinking about complex and evolving global fields. She is Director of the ANU Centre for International Governance and Justice, Chair of the Geoeconomics Working Group and a Visiting Professor at Harvard Law School. She is currently working on a variety of issues relating to governing in complexity, including policy-making at the intersection of economics, security, social issues and the environment. 

Miranda Forsyth, also a Professor at RegNet, is an interdisciplinary researcher and socio-legal scholar.  Her research focuses on understanding different justice and security needs, and how these can best be met through state and non-state forms of justice. She is Director of the ANU Centre for Restorative Justice and an ARC Future Fellow. She is currently working on projects involving restorative regulation in the context of environmental harm; sorcery accusation related violence; relational security and tribal fighting in the PNG Highlands.

COVID protocols

 The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Image of dragonfly by jonleong64 from pixabay, free to use under the Pixabay Content License.

Event Speakers

Climate change is not just an environmental threat but poses major and growing risks to the health of today’s population and future generations. It is already adversely affecting human health and health systems, and projected climate change will also increasingly undermine the functioning of health care systems and broader public health efforts. While adaptation is essential, there will be limits to our ability to adapt, and cutting emissions rapidly to protect health is vital. Progress towards zero emissions will bring not only long term benefits for health by reducing the risks from climate change but will also improve health in the near term, for instance through reduced exposure to air pollution by replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy; healthy and more sustainable food and transport systems. This presentation will summarise the evidence for the health (co-) benefits of climate action and suggest how progress towards net zero emissions could be accelerated.

Episode 13 will feature Prof Sir Andy Haines: Professor of Environmental Change and Public Health, Centre on Climate Change and Planetary Health, co-director of the WHO Collaborating Centre on Climate Change, Health and Sustainable Development, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. 

Andy was formerly Professor of Primary Health Care at UCL and Director of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine from 2001- October 2010. He was a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change for the 2nd , 3rd  and 5th assessment exercises. He chaired the Rockefeller /Lancet Commission on Planetary Health and the InterAcademy Partnership working group on climate change and health. He currently co-chairs the Lancet Pathfinder Commission on Pathways to a Healthy Net Zero Future. He was knighted for services to medicine in 2005. He was awarded the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement in 2022 and a DSc honoris causa by ANU in 2024.

The Saving the World Webinar Series is presented by the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse, the series discusses the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

Event Speakers

Photo of Andy Haines by a window

Andy Haines

Sir Andy Haines is Professor of Environmental Change and Public Health, Centre on Climate Change and Planetary Health, co-director of the WHO Collaborating Centre on Climate Change Health and Sustainable Development, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Sharon Friel

Sharon Friel

Prof Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), Australian National University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia and co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

Megan Arthur

Megan Arthur

Dr Megan Arthur is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health. She studies the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

Australia has been described as a beacon and haven where Money Laundering (ML) thrives: so, how can Australia improve ML prevention?

Criminals who generate profits from illegal activities have used Australian banks, casinos, and real-estate to conceal the illicit origin of the money and integrate it into the legitimate economy. Although the current Anti-Money Laundering (AML) regime evidently works to detect and disrupt cases of ML, it maintains a few limitations which allow the crime to continue occurring in Australia.

This thesis argues that ML in Australia can be better prevented with changes to the AML regime which directly address the ML activities observed to occur frequently in this study. Extension of AML regulation to currently uncovered entities – such as real-estate and lawyers – is an important amendment to identify ML which frequently occurs through activities such as professional services or purchase of high-value goods.

This seminar is Nada's final presentation of her doctoral candidature.

About the speaker

Nada Jevtovic is a second-generation Australian with Serbian-Greek heritage. Her passion for crime prevention and criminological research stems from a deep gratitude of the life her family has enjoyed since fleeing war in Europe a few generations ago. She takes pride in giving back to Australia and the community with her work and research.

After completing her Bachelor and Master degrees in Criminology at ANU, Nada began working as a Forensic Consultant supporting Australian government and private entities with Anti-money laundering and anti-corruption efforts. She is currently completing her Doctorate at the ANU. In her downtime she enjoys being with family and spending many hours at the driving range.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ACT government’s COVID Smart behaviours can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation is a dual-delivery event. Registration is only required for Zoom attendance; registration for in-person attendance is not required as neither the ANU nor ACT Health conduct contact tracing any longer.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: image of Dame Nellie Melba on the AUD$100 note from flickr by spelio, free to use under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 DEED licence

A series of webinars created by the Hothouse at ANU, discussing the intersections between climate change, inequity, and human health. The focus is on actions that enable transformative change away from the harmful consumptogenic system to systems that promote good health, social equity and environmental wellbeing.

This episode featured Susan Park, Professor of Global Governance in Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney.

Do international grievance mechanisms work? These non-legal, non-binding mechanisms are increasingly used to provide recourse for people suffering environmental and social harm from internationally funded development projects. But, to date, there have been no studies to show how these mechanisms make a difference to people using them.

Susan's research examines whether international grievance mechanisms provide redress for the environmental and social impacts of international development projects, with implications for planetary health. The World Bank lends approximately $20 billion annually to developing states to fund energy, telecommunications, and infrastructure projects to address poverty and improve peoples’ lives. Yet development projects may have dramatic and irreversible environmental and social impacts: loss of lives, livelihoods, and land, a breakdown in community cohesion, species extinction, habitat loss, and irreparable damage to local ecosystems. Despite the World Bank’s Inspection Panel operating for 30 years, we still do not know how it – or any other international grievance mechanism – contributes to improving development conditions. Many people harmed by international development projects choose these non-legal international procedures to have their voices heard often because legal and political options may not be available to them. Indeed, around the world people put themselves in grave harm from state and corporate reprisal for speaking out to protect their environment.

Identifying the use of international grievance mechanisms for addressing injustice is imperative given the rise of conflicts from development projects globally and the increasing number of environmental ‘defenders’ being killed to protect themselves and their environment. International development practices are also contributing to the crossing of known ecological system boundaries globally, such as climate change, habitat loss, and species extinction, the outcome of which is likely to “surpass known experience and which alter …almost all human and natural systems” (UNDRR 2019: 32).

Susan presented uses of an eco-justice frame to analyse grievances against international development projects financed by Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) to investigate whether they lead to improvements for people and ecosystems. An eco-justice approach combines the right of nature (to exist, repair, and regenerate) with environmental procedural rights for humans (to have access to information, to participate, and to have access to justice in environmental matters). Using an eco-justice frame for addressing grievances against development arguably can bring us closer to recognising both human and planetary health.

Event Speakers

Nick Frank

Nick Frank

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse in the School of Regulation and Global Governance. Prior to this, he was an Associate Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance.

Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity.

Understanding power, politics, policies, people and processes to improve governance for planetary health equity outcomes.

Join ARC Laureate Fellow Prof Sharon Friel and Laureate Research Fellows Drs Megan Arthur and Nick Frank as they showcase some of their Planetary Health Equity Hothouse research. Planetary health equity (PHE) is defined here as the equitable enjoyment of good health in a stable Earth system.

PHE is in crisis. Despite evidence of these massive challenges and multiple calls to action, why has there been so little effective remedial action? And more importantly, how can we overcome this failure?

To answer these questions, the Hothouse team will discuss new research for understanding power, politics, policies, people and processes that enable coherent governance to improve PHE outcomes.

About the speakers

Sharon Friel is an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow and Professor of Health Equity in the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet). She is Director of the PHE Hothouse and Australian Research Centre for Health Equity (ARCHE) at the ANU.

Nicholas Frank is a Laureate Research Fellow with the PHE Hothouse at RegNet. Nicholas specializes in the political economy of trade and investment governance. Nicholas employs formal theory, econometrics, inferential network approaches, and text-as-data techniques in his research.

Megan Arthur is a Laureate Research Fellow with the PHE Hothouse at RegNet. She is an interdisciplinary qualitative researcher working at the intersection of social policy and public health, studying the politics of governance for health and wellbeing at multiple levels.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ACT government’s COVID Smart behaviours can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation is in-person only. Registration is not required for in-person attendance as neither the ANU nor ACT Health conduct contact tracing any longer.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Planetary Health Equity Hothouse logo from hothouse.anu.edu.au

Research in progress exploring what is known about stateless people in Australia and the barriers they experience in realising their human right to nationality.

Statelessness is not a new phenomenon, but in the last decade, the serious human rights implications for individuals without nationality have received much international attention. Yet this international engagement and focus is not reflected in Australia, where there is little debate, knowledge or public awareness of statelessness.

Stateless people have migrated to Australia for decades yet are generally not officially ‘counted’ or recognised by government agencies. At the end of 2022, the UNHCR reported that 8,314 stateless people live in Australia. This figure is imprecise as statelessness is largely derived from self-reports, and Australia has no statelessness determination procedure.

The Peter McMullin Centre on Statelessness Australian Research Council project seeks to address this knowledge gap and learn more about this population. This work-in-progress presentation will explore what is known about stateless people in Australia and the barriers they experience in realising their human right to nationality.

About the speaker

Dr Philippa Duell-Piening is a Visiting Fellow at RegNet, ANU and a Research Fellow at the Peter McMullin Centre on Statelessness. She is working on the Australian Research Council-funded Understanding Statelessness in Australia research project. Philippa conducts socio-legal qualitative research, including interviews with people with lived experience of statelessness and other stakeholders.

Before entering academia, Philippa led the Victorian Refugee Health Network, which works with government, health and settlement services to build the capacity of the Victorian health system to be more responsive to the needs of people from refugee backgrounds, including people seeking asylum. Outside of Australia, Philippa worked in the forced migration contexts of Timor-Leste in 2002 and on the Thai-Myanmar border in 2012.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ACT government’s COVID Smart behaviours can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation is in-person only. Registration is not required for in-person attendance as neither the ANU nor ACT Health conduct contact tracing any longer.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Public domain image of American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) index card - often the only form of documentation - for a stateless person destined for Australia following the Second World War from Wikimedia Commons.

Kseniya Oksamytna will discuss her recent book, Advocacy and Change in International Organizations: Communication, Protection, and Reconstruction in UN Peacekeeping.

How do international organizations change? Many organizations expand into new areas or abandon programmes of work. The book - Advocacy and change in international organizations: communication, protection, and reconstruction in UN peacekeeping - is the 2024 winner of the Chadwick F. Alger Best Book Award, International Studies Association. It argues that international organisations do so not only at the collective direction of member states.

Advocacy is a crucial but overlooked source of change in international organizations. Different actors can advocate for change: national diplomats, international bureaucrats, external experts, or civil society activists. They can use one of three advocacy strategies: social pressure, persuasion, and “authority talk”.

This book demonstrates how the advocacy-focused framework explains the origins of three workstreams of contemporary UN peacekeeping operations: communication, protection, and reconstruction. The issue of strategic communications was promoted by UN officials through the strategy of persuasion.

Protection of civilians emerged due to a partially successful social influence campaign by a coalition of elected Security Council members and a subsequent (and successful) persuasion efforts by Canada. Quick impact projects entered peacekeepers' practice as the result of “authority talk” by an expert panel.  

About the speaker

Dr Kseniya Oksamytna is a Senior Lecturer at City, University of London. She is also a Visiting Research Fellow in the Conflict, Security, and Development Research Group at King’s College London. Her research interests are international organizations, international security, and peace operations.

This seminar presentation is an online-only event. Please note the special time of 10.30am rather than the routine 12.30pm as the speaker will be in the UK time zone.

Image credit: ‘Advocacy and change in international organizations: communication, protection, and reconstruction in UN peacekeeping’ book cover, supplied by the author.

How do we mainstream the use of restorative justice in the context of environmental offending, which in Australia is virtually untested? What can we learn from New Zealand?

The use of restorative justice in the context of environmental offending in Australia is virtually untested, except for an out of court encounter in Victoria and two uses in cases before the Land and Environment Court of New South Wales. This seminar will explore ways to increase (mainstream) the use of restorative justice in such a context, including as a diversion from prosecution (front-end model) or in the context of sentencing (back-end model).

Does the mainstreaming of environmental restorative justice require legislative change (noting that recent changes in NSW and Victorian legislation have not spurred on the use of environmental restorative justice)? Is a judicial champion needed (noting the role Judge McElrea has played in New Zealand)? Does mainstreaming need to be driven by the prosecutors, victims, or offenders? This seminar will address such questions drawing on the experience in New Zealand where environmental restorative justice is more routinely used.

About the speaker

Mark Hamilton is a lecturer in law and criminology at the Australian Catholic University. He has had the opportunity to teach a variety of units including introductions to criminology and criminal justice, violence, juvenile justice, foundations of law and legal research, criminal law, evidence and environmental law. His primary interest is restorative justice in the context of environmental law. He is also interested in green criminology and environmental victims. Mark completed his PhD at the University of New South Wales in 2019, with his doctorate subsequently being published as a monograph (Environmental Crime and Restorative Justice: Justice as Meaningful Involvement, Palgrave Macmillan, 2021).

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ACT government’s COVID Smart behaviours can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation is a dual-delivery event. Registration is only required for Zoom attendance; registration for in-person attendance is not required as neither the ANU nor ACT Health conduct contact tracing any longer.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Image of closure signs at Rozelle Parklands, Sydney, due to asbestos contamination, 21 February 2024, by Jpatokal from Wikipedia Commons, free to use under CC BY-SA 4.0 DEED licence.

This work focuses on making discourse on the metaverse legible in the context of story and history, considering a safer, more responsible, and more sustainable future metaverse.

The metaverse was first introduced in Neal Stephenson’s novel Snow Crash over thirty years ago, and the book continues to serve as its basic blueprint. Stephenson’s rendering of the metaverse as a persistent, immersive, networked environment that extends or even replaces reality has been taken up as an imagined endpoint for the next phase of life online.

The underlying technology stack, centred on VR goggles, can be found faithfully reproduced in the research and development roadmaps of contemporary industry. As a set of technologies, and as a set of ideas, the metaverse continues to evolve and take on different forms, but its foundations have long been laid in the popular imagination.

Maia and Ellen's work is the beginning of a different type of exploration into the consequences of this imaginary unfolding: one focused on the pathways by which the metaverse is being defined and developed – through fiction, through history, and through the levers of decision-making in the present. Their goal, in making present discourse on the metaverse legible in the context of story and history, is to offer pathways to consider a safer, more responsible, and more sustainable metaverse for the future.

About the speakers

Maia Gould is a leader within the new School of Cybernetics at the ANU, looking at technology adoption from a human and earth lens. Maia loves working at the intersection between disciplines. After studying arts and science at university 20 years ago, she trained and worked as a science writer and has since held a variety of strategy, research, communications and business development roles. She holds a Master of Bioethics focused on emerging science and technology and has worked with some of Australia’s largest professional service firms and managed social research on issues such as mental health and corporate social responsibility. Maia is passionate about helping ideas and people find their place in a noisy, complex world, and manages a diverse team at the School of Cybernetics.

Ellen O’Brien is a researcher at the ANU’s School of Cybernetics. Her focus is in emerging technologies, including Artificial Intelligence, and complex systems research. She pursues projects and opportunities that shape systems change within sectors such as Health, Government and the cultural sector. Throughout her work at the ANU she has been part of several key strategic initiatives for the University, helping to build the University’s first Innovation Institute and to establish the School of Cybernetics — the first new disciplinary school of this century at the ANU.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ACT government’s COVID Smart behaviours can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation is a dual-delivery event. Registration is only required for Zoom attendance; registration for in-person attendance is not required as neither the ANU nor ACT Health conduct contact tracing any longer.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Image of a metaverse festival by Duncan Rawlinson – Duncan.co from flickr, free to use under CC BY-NC 2.0 DEED licence.

 

Strategies of managerial governance - outsourcing, cost recovery, performance indicators - produce overkill in the fields of regulation, crime control, and national security.

How strategies of managerial governance, such as outsourcing, cost recovery, and the use of performance indicators  produce overkill in the fields of regulation, crime control, and national security.

About the speaker

Peter Grabosky is Professor Emeritus in the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), College of Asia and the Pacific. Previous employers included the Australian Institute of Criminology and the South Australian Attorney-General’s Department, inter alia. His interests lie in the areas of cybercrime, regulation, policing, the role of non-state actors in public policy, and most recently, excesses of the liberal-democratic state. 

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ACT government’s COVID Smart behaviours can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation is in-person only. Registration is not required for in-person attendance as neither the ANU nor ACT Health conduct contact tracing any longer.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: image of a professional about to touch a tablet device with cyber security related icons hovering around her finger by Worranan from Adobe Stock used under Education License.

People, planet, profits, and health are inextricably linked.

In this talk, Sharon will discuss findings from the Lancet series on people, profits, and health: the commercial determinants of health.

Many commercial organisations’ practices and products are contributing to growing health problems and harming the environment, with industries that produce tobacco, alcohol, highly processed foods, and fossil fuels responsible for over a third of preventable global deaths each year. Issues of corporate power, government failure to regulate and the role of civil society in holding commercial actors to account will be explored.

About the speaker

Sharon Friel is an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Planetary Health Equity Hothouse and Australian Research Centre for Health Equity (ARCHE) in RegNet, Australian National University. Her work focuses on governance of the planetary, social and commercial determinants of health inequities. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia and the Academy of Health and Medical Sciences of Australia.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Photo of processed food for sale at a local store in Gizo, Western Province, Solomon Islands by Filip Milovac from flickr, used under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 DEED licence .

This seminar is the third in the Migration, Mobility & Movement Network Seminar Series presented by the School of Archaeology & Anthropology and the Migration Hub at the School of Regulation and Global Governance.

The 2022 Australian Federal election observed record-level ethnic minority candidates elected. However, the shares of candidates and elected Members of Parliaments with ethnic minority backgrounds are still much lower than their relative shares in the population. In this regard, Australia has lagged behind other major settler countries.

The underrepresentation of ethnic minorities in the political institutions can exacerbate inequality between majority and minority populations and increase feelings of alienation among minority groups, as political representation is a crucial step towards having the interests of the represented groups heard in the democratic system.

In this seminar, we look at the political representation of ethnic candidates in the federal election and examine whether ethnic minorities are selected by political parties in areas with high ethnic minority concentrations.

Our findings suggest a positive association between higher ethnic minority concentration and ethnic representation, albeit an overall under-representation of ethnic minorities in the Parliament. However, for the two major parties, ethnic minority candidates are less likely to be in safe seats, even when there is high ethnic minority concentration. Findings from our research suggest that ethnic voting is evident but it is perhaps too early to celebrate higher levels of ethnic representation in Australian politics.

About the speakers

Qing Guan is a research fellow at the ANU School of Demography and a member of the Australian Centre on China in the World. Her research focuses on understanding the trends and consequences of international migration in Australia and the Asia Pacific region using demographic and statistical tools.

Juliet Pietsch is a Professor of Political Science and the Head of School of Government and International Relations at Griffith University. She is a leading scholar in the specialist fields of migration politics and political behaviour in Australia and Southeast Asia, and an expert on irregular migration in Europe, Southeast Asia and Australia.

How to attend

This seminar is being held at the School of Regulation and Global Governance on Level 2 of the Coombs Extension Building in the Teaching Room (Room 2.10).

You can also join the seminar online by registering via this Zoom link.

Image credit: Red Check Mark on Box by Tara Winstead from Pexels (free to use under Pexels licence)

This seminar looks at the changing forms and uses of technologies of surveillance, and the implications of their application for the criminal justice system.

The work stems from a commissioned chapter written with Mark Wood (Deakin University) for the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Critical and Cultural Criminological Theory, edited by Kevin Haggerty and Lois Presser.

Through a series of theoretical reflections and case studies, it explores how surveillance is changing form as well as expanding into new spheres of public and private life. These changes are evident across the institutions of criminalization and criminal justice.

Notions of sousveillance and dataveillance are identified and explained, noting that surveillance is no longer the preserve of the visual, and that data monitoring offers new and more insidious ways of conducting surveillance.

About the speaker

Andrew Goldsmith is Matthew Flinders Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Criminology at Flinders University. His research over 40 years has focused on policing and organised crime, and more recently, cybercrime. He has a particular interest in how new technologies are influencing how crimes are committed as well as how they shape the practices of policing, courts, and prisons. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia, and has degrees from the University of Adelaide, Monash University, University of Toronto and the London School of Economics.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Image of surveillance camera graffiti art by Republica on pixabay, free to use under pixabay licence.

The presentation considers a security governance possibility, born in the Global South, with implications for defunding police, decolonising security, and reimagining justice. 

This presentation tells the story of the journey of Peace Committees, a restorative inspired, community-centred safety initiative that reimagines community policing. The journey begins with the 1994 South African elections, is supported by the Mandela and Mbeki governments, is brought to a halt by the Zuma government, and is currently entering a new phase in Oakland, California.  It is a story with implications for the defund the police movement, calls to decolonialise security and justice, security budgets, and community-led governance. 

About the speaker

Clifford Shearing is currently an Emeritus Professor at the Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies at the University of Toronto and at the Law Faculty at the University of Cape Town. He is a Visiting Professorial Fellow at the University of New South Wales, an Adjunct Professor at the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University and a strategy advisor at ProActive Resolutions. He studies policing and its evolution. His current research is focused on the regulation of 21st Century harmscapes.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ACT government’s COVID Smart behaviours can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation is a dual-delivery event. Registration is only required for Zoom attendance; registration for in-person attendance is not required as neither the ANU nor ACT Health conduct contact tracing any longer.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Image of handmade peace themed postcard with ‘peace’ in various languages by Stephanie on flickr free to use under CC BY-ND 2.0 DEED licence

Strengthening human rights protection systems in a Pacific regional human rights architecture.

Despite human rights being contested in the Pacific, all Pacific Island Forum (PIF) Member States have various normative and institutional framework that ensures their protection and promotion.

The human rights architecture at the national and regional level varies significantly with various institutional and normative gaps. At the national level, many Pacific States continue to struggle with the conceptualisation of human rights and reconciling its conflicts with culture and religion, the two dominant narratives that characterise Pacific States. This project looks at the importance of creating institutional frameworks for the protection of human rights at the national level.

It also examines the current human rights architecture at the regional (PIF) level which is weak despite the aspirations of Pacific Leaders captured in various regional frameworks including the 2009 Pacific Plan, the 2019 Framework for Pacific Regionalism and recently the 2050 Strategy for the Blue Pacific Continent calling for a region known for its ‘full observance of democratic values, the rule of law, the defence and promotion of all human rights.’ To strengthen the protection of human rights at the regional level, the region needs to add “teeth to its bark”. The time has come for the Pacific to explore the creation of institutional and normative frameworks that ensure accountability and enforceability of human rights commitments by Pacific leaders.

This seminar is Romulo’s final presentation of his doctoral candidature.

About the speaker

Romulo Nayacalevu is a Fijian lawyer who has worked in the area of human rights across the Pacific for over 15 years before deciding to do his PhD in an area that he is passionate about, strengthening human rights regimes in the Pacific. He holds a Bachelor of Laws from the University of the South Pacific, and postgraduate degrees in governance, international affairs, diplomacy and law both from USP and ANU. He took up his PhD studies in the middle of the Covid pandemic.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be dual-delivery.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Public domain image from the Young Pacific Leaders 4-6 Oct 2023 Human Rights Workshop, Apia, Samoa from US Embassy NZ flickr account.

Join Jon Altman as he explores how workable the proposed regulatory framework to ‘repair nature’ might be on First Nations titled lands that are fast expanding as the main portion of the Australia’s National Reserve System.

Since September 2022 the Albanese government has looked to expand the previous government’s Agriculture Biodiversity Stewardship Market Bill 2022 into a more sophisticated and spatially far-reaching framework to financially underwrite biodiversity conservation and monitor its expected improvement.

This is a part of the new government’s response to the 2020 Samuel Review of the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act, found to be deficient, and the 2021 State of the Environment Report documenting ongoing biodiversity loss. In December 2022 a lengthy exposure draft of the Nature Repair Market Bill was released for comment.

In this seminar, based in part on his submission on the exposure draft, Jon explores how workable the proposed regulatory framework to ‘repair nature’ might be on First Nations titled lands that are fast expanding as the main portion of the Australia’s National Reserve System.

The proposal is modelled on the perceived success of the commodification of carbon (emissions) although carbon as property is clearly very different from biodiversity as property. The proposal to commodify nature is a radical policy departure with an eye no doubt on possible global ‘nature-related’ financial disclosures requirements currently being considered by an international Taskforce.

But if passed, will Nature Repair Market law be effective in financing biodiversity conservation and what might be its shortcomings from the perspective of First Nations landholders?

About the speaker

Jon Altman is an anthropologist, economist and policy analyst who has had a decades-long interest in development alternatives on First Nations lands that will help protect and enhance their exceptional cultural and environmental values while delivering livelihoods. He currently a non-executive director of a number of Indigenous led not-for-profit organisations including the Karrdakd Kanjdji Trust and Original Power and is an adviser to the First Nations Clean Energy Network.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

Image credit: Image of beautiful billabong with buff and pig damage in Kakadu supplied by the speaker.

Much of our policy process focuses on the role of physical infrastructure, that is, structures that hope to mitigate the impact of shocks and disasters such as floods, terrorism, and crime. But a growing body of evidence suggests that social infrastructure - the places and spaces that build and maintain connections, such as libraries, parks, and pubs - hold greater potential to blunt the impact of such events. Using qualitative and quantitative evidence from cases around the world, Daniel pushes us to appreciate how the modest and often underappreciated field of social infrastructure should be front and center as we confront wicked problems.

About the speaker

An award winning author, Daniel Aldrich has published five books including Building Resilience and Black Wave, more than 90 peer-reviewed articles, and written op-eds for the New York Times, CNN, HuffPost, and many other media outlets. He has spent more than 5 years in India, Japan, and Africa carrying out fieldwork and his work has been funded by the Fulbright Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Abe Foundation, the Rasmussen Foundation, and the Japan Foundation, among other institutions. In 2021 he was Klein Lecturer at Northeastern University.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

Image credit: Four hands in interlocking grip by truthseeker08 from pixabay (free to use under pixabay licence)

This talk traces the rise of a transnational legal order on human protection and evaluates the effects of the ‘accountability turn’ at the heart of this TLO on international lawmaking and global governance.

In recent years, we have witnessed a dramatic transformation in the international accountability landscape, with new practices to mobilize an array of mechanisms as a direct response to deficits in international protection of populations during situations of violent conflict and atrocity. Transnational efforts to pursue accountability for international crimes committed by Russia since the invasion of Ukraine in 2022 are unprecedented, and accountability has been prominent in the current International Court of Justice case on genocide in Gaza. However, this ‘accountability turn’ in situations of mass atrocity and violent conflict did not emerge in a vacuum, and events in recent conflicts illuminate a trend towards the growing remit of international accountability during hostilities to advance protection in real time.

This presentation maps the emergence of a transnational legal order (TLO) on human protection and evaluates the effects on international lawmaking and global governance. It argues that the humanization of international law – the process of elevating individual human rights across all domains of international law – serves as an anchor for legal efforts to address the deficits in the global politics of protection during mass atrocity violence through accountability, which is at the heart of this TLO.

There are, however, critical questions that arise in relation to the ‘atrocitisation’ of human rights and accountability that this presentation will also consider.

About the speaker

Cecilia Jacob is Associate Professor in the Department of International Relations at the ANU and ARC DECRA fellow (2020-2024). Her work focuses on civilian protection, mass atrocity prevention, and international human protection norms. Cecilia is editor of Global Responsibility to Protect and chairs the Asia-Pacific Working Group of Global Action Against Mass Atrocities (GAAMAC).

Her books include Child Security in Asia: The Impact of Armed Conflict in Cambodia and Myanmar, and edited volumes Civilian Protection in the Twenty-First Century: Governance and Responsibility in a Fragmented World and Implementing the Responsibility to Protect: A Future Agenda.

Cecilia has worked as a consultant for the UN Office on the Prevention of Genocide and the Responsibility to Protect and has been a visiting fellow at the Institute for Ethics Law and Armed Conflict at the University of Oxford, and the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ACT government’s COVID Smart behaviours can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation is a dual-delivery event. Registration is only required for Zoom attendance; registration for in-person attendance is not required as neither the ANU nor ACT Health conduct contact tracing any longer.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Image of the articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights chalked on the steps of University of Essex, by University of Essex on flickr, free to use under CC BY 2.0 DEED licence

This seminar presentation covers updated information and an analytical framework for understanding the drivers behind violence related to accusations of sorcery and witchcraft, and the types of responses being trialled to curtail the violence.

Beliefs in sorcery and witchcraft and the violence they generate across the globe are often seen as remote from modern realities, and likely to gradually dwindle of their own accord.

This is a mistake on both counts. In dozens of countries across the globe - from the United Kingdom to Nigeria to Papua New Guinea - belief in magic or the supernatural still exists, and is used to explain misfortunes of various kinds, particularly death and sickness, but also unequal economic development.

These beliefs structure the lives of individuals and communities in multiple ways, sometimes leading to out-casting or violence against those accused of having used witchcraft or sorcery to cause harm.

This talk will discuss updated data from PNG and also the actions of activists across the globe to address the issue at both the level of the United Nations and through grassroots advocacy.

About the speaker

Miranda Forsyth is a Professor at RegNet. Prior to coming to ANU, she was a senior lecturer in criminal law at the law school of the University of the South Pacific, based in Port Vila, Vanuatu.

The central analytical question animating Miranda’s scholarship is how people’s diverse justice needs can best be met in contexts of multiple legal and normative orders. Her geographical focus has been primarily in the Pacific Islands region, particularly Vanuatu and Papua New Guinea.

Current research projects focussing on the Pacific include the potential of Restorative Justice for the Pacific islands region, particularly in relation to gender based violence; the promise and challenges of Community Rule-Making as regulatory innovation; and a multi-year project on overcoming sorcery accusation related violence in Papua New Guinea. Miranda is also working on the development of a new agenda for Environmental Restorative Justice in both Australia and internationally.

Miranda draws creatively upon theories and methodological approaches from the disciplines of law, anthropology and criminology to interrogate these issues, working in close partnerships with Pacific islands researchers and research institutions.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Image of newspaper headlines related to sorcery accusations, provided by Miranda Forsyth.

China’s green credit balance and green bond stocks have surged to become the world’s largest within five years. China’s regulatory pathway to this and other achievements in green finance remains an underexplored question.

In this presentation, Wenting and Peter will explain the distinct green finance regulatory model that China has developed, including its use of a richer set of regulatory styles than might be expected from a system ostensibly based only on central planning. The Chinese green finance regulatory model encompasses two parts, the pressure driving mechanism and experimental governance.

The pressure driving mechanism swiftly injects green finance targets into all levels of bureaucracy. Experimental governance through green finance pilot zones aggregates real-world information about probabilities attaching to the failure or success of a given regulatory approach, and so overcomes Hayekian suspicion that centralized planning may not calculate accurately. The pressure driving mechanism further adjusts targets and tasks based on information from multi-level reporting loops.

The Chinese regulatory practices that Wenting and Peter identify shed light on how to address some of the common challenges facing transforming financial systems into green or sustainable finance. Their article is published at Tsinghua China Law Review, which can be accessed here.

About the speakers

Wenting Cheng is a Grand Challenge Fellow in the ANU College of Law, working at ANU Grand Challenge Program “Zero-Carbon Energy for the Asia Pacific”. She obtained her PhD degree in Regulation and Governance from RegNet. Her green finance-related research also considers setting green standards in Chinese green finance and China’s climate policy along the Belt and Road.

Peter Drahos is Professor of Law and Governance in the Department of Law, European University Institute, Florence, Italy. He is Emeritus Professor at RegNet and holds a Chair in Intellectual Property at Queen Mary University of London. Drahos is the author of Survival Governance: Energy and Climate in the Chinese Century, published by Oxford University Press in 2021.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

Image credit: Image of plants sprouting from stacks of coins by nattanan23 from pixabay (free to use under pixabay licence)

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology

In this presentation I will argue that in order to decolonise migration studies, scholars must not only acknowledge persisting imperial and colonial legacies, but also centre Indigenous sovereignty. This is particularly important for scholars who research about migration to settler colonial nations. Still too often First Nations are rendered invisible in migration scholarship. The complicity and implicated subjectivity of migrants in settler colonial societies, which is apparent in Indigenous and settler colonial scholarship, is still largely overlooked within migration studies. I will discuss some of the main methodological implications of centring Indigenous sovereignty in migration studies. These include: centring Indigenous perspectives, epistemologies and methodologies; recognising the entanglements of national, transnational, imperial and colonial histories; rejecting Eurocentric and Nation-centric approaches to the study of migration and mobility; avoiding any conflation of Indigenous struggles for sovereignty with white nationalism and nativism; developing community-informed and participatory approaches; decentring English and other colonial languages; and acknowledging the growing complexity and richness of contemporary identities, material realities, and decolonial struggles.

This event is presented in person and online. Zoom details below

About the speaker

Dr Francesco Ricatti is Associate Professor of Italian Studies at the Australian National University. He currently lives and works on Ngunnawal and Ngambri land. He is an historian of Italian migration to Australia, and his current research focuses on transcultural and decolonial approaches to migration studies, Australian history, and Italian transnational studies. He is a former President of Oral History Victoria, and a former Deputy Director of the Monash Migration and Inclusion Centre. His most recent book is Italians in Australia: History, Memory, Identity (Palgrave, 2018).

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

For online attendance, see Zoom details below

https://anu.zoom.us/j/86557701787?pwd=cnIreVB5eG8vNmlibWtHMjRKaEtIZz09
(Meeting ID: 865 5770 1787. Password: 836061)

Photo credit: By sebastianbourges on Adobe Stock

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology

Kate will present research being undertaken for her ARC project on refugee community sponsorship (Discovery Project with Professor Susan Kneebone and Dr Anthea Vogl). The project is the first large-scale study of community or private sponsorship of refugees in Australia and includes comparisons with Canada, UK, Ireland and New Zealand. There are myriad models of refugee community sponsorship but most involve citizen groups funding and assisting with refugee resettlement. While Canada has had such programs for over 40 years and Australia’s first program started in 1979, until very recently there has been minimal academic literature on community sponsorship. Early scholarship celebrated the successes of Canadian programs and aimed to export Canadian sponsorship models to other countries. However, scholars are now raising more critical questions about the role and practice of community sponsorship.

Kate, Susan and Anthea’s project will investigate how notions of citizenship, community and sanctuary are conceptualised and mobilised by different community sponsorship actors and critically evaluate community sponsorship’s role nationally (against the background of Australia’s infamous refugee policies) and globally in the context of growing displacement and Global North/South inequities in refugee responsibility. Kate is particularly interested in exploring sponsors’ understandings and enactments of ‘sanctuary’.

This event is presented in person and online. Zoom details below

About the speaker

Associate Professor Kate Ogg has been at the ANU since 2013. She completed her PhD at RegNet and is now an Associate Professor and Associate Dean (Higher Degree Research) at the ANU College of Law. Her areas of research are refugee law, forced migration and displacement, human rights law (with a focus on human mobility), litigation, and feminist legal theory and method. Kate is the author of Protection from Refuge: From Refugee Rights to Migration Management (Cambridge University Press, 2022). The monograph is the first global and comparative examination of the role courts play in refugee journeys.

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

For online attendance, see Zoom details below

https://anu.zoom.us/j/86557701787?pwd=cnIreVB5eG8vNmlibWtHMjRKaEtIZz09
(Meeting ID: 865 5770 1787. Password: 836061)

Photo credit: By Dedraw Studio on Adobe Stock

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology

THIS EVENT HAS CHANGED.

This event was formerly titled ‘Safe legal pathways’ or new colonial frontiers? Grappling with the new enthusiasm in refugee policy and was to be presented by Associate Professor Matt Zagor ANU College of Law, Associate Professor and Director of the Law Reform and Social Justice program

REVISED EVENT

This paper arises from the author’s recent experience of completing an impact study of an international NGO’s pro-poor social mobility program, based in Quảng Nam province and Đà Nẵng City in central Vietnam. The Bright Scholars program is aimed at improving the life chances of scholastically talented young people from socio-economically disadvantaged families by providing a small stipend to enable them to undertake tertiary study in the city. Virtually all of the eligible students come from rural or periurban backgrounds, meaning that winning a Bright scholarship is the start of a rural-urban migration journey over a modest spatial distance, but a significant sociocultural one.

By many measures the Bright Scholars program is spectacularly successful as an intervention in the life chances of the children of chronically poor farming families, and the paper will reflect on how certain characteristics of Vietnamese rural-urban migration networks might facilitate this success, among other things. Inevitably this NGO intervention also has its limitations, and we’ll consider whether access to tertiary education alone is enough to give these young people equality within the opportunity structure of post-reform Vietnam relative to their privileged urban peers, asking what further interventions the NGO might make here.

Key concepts for this paper include social class as a geographical category, returns to education, social and cultural capital, and rural-urban networks as avenues for spatial and social mobility.

About the speaker

Dr Ashley Carruthers teaches in the School of Archaeology and Anthropology, CASS, ANU. His recent research and consulting in Vietnam has been focused on rural people in and on the edge of the city in Vietnam, and how they deploy rural-urban networks as a means of livelihood and various forms of mobility.

This event is presented in person and online. Zoom details below

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

For online attendance, see Zoom details below
https://anu.zoom.us/j/86557701787?pwd=cnIreVB5eG8vNmlibWtHMjRKaEtIZz09
(Meeting ID: 865 5770 1787. Password: 836061)

Photo credit: By Svetazi on Adobe Stock

 

 

While much is known about the barriers that prevent policy and governance for public health, less is known about the strategies and conditions that can enable effective public health advocacy. In this presentation Belinda Townsend presents findings from two large scale narrative reviews of advocacy strategies in the commercial determinants of health.

Belinda presents a review of 65 relevant studies that identifies 6 strategies and 4 conditions that have enabled the elevation of public health issues in domestic, regional, bilateral and global trade policymaking.

The second review applies a political science typology to 144 studies of NGO tactics in the extractive, tobacco, food, alcohol, pharmaceuticals, weapons, and asbestos domains. The analysis identify 18 different inside and outside strategies applied by NGOs to attempt to influence commercial, government and intergovernmental organisations.

This event will be delivered online via Zoom only.

Image credit: Image of “ADVOCACY” in white font against black background supplied by Julia Wee, no copyright is claimed.

Event Speakers

Dr Belinda Townsend is Deputy Director of the Australian Research Centre for Health Equity and Fellow in the School of Regulation and Global Governance at the Australian National University.

In her new book Corporate nature: an insider’s ethnography of global conservation, Sarah Milne raises questions about the kind of world that emerges from mainstream green intervention – as seen in the work of big international NGOs, which have significant influence over nature conservation in the global south.

 

The ideas and institutions that we deploy to “save nature” are important because they shape the socio-natural contours of our world.

In her new book Corporate nature: an insider’s ethnography of global conservation, Sarah Milne raises questions about the kind of world that emerges from mainstream green intervention – as seen in the work of big international NGOs, which have significant influence over nature conservation in the global south.

Sarah’s book draws on a decade of ethnographic observation and practical experience with Conservation International, and its operations in Cambodia. She reveals how big international NGOs struggle in the face of complexity; and how neat policy ideas like Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) are transformed on the ground, often with perverse side-effects. New insights emerge about the power and ethics of global conservation in practice.

Three respondents - Jenson SassRosie Cooney and Sango Mahanty - will reflect on the book in relation to their own work on corporate power, global conservation, and Cambodian resource frontiers respectively.

About the author

Dr Sarah Milne is a Senior Lecturer at the Crawford School of Public Policy, College of Asia and the Pacific. She gained her PhD in Geography from the University of Cambridge, and has over twenty years’ experience with conservation projects - as a practitioner, scholar and advocate. Her book Corporate nature: an insider’s ethnography of global conservation was published by the University of Arizona Press in late 2022.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

Image credit: Book cover from The University of Arizona Press website.

Event Speakers

Sarah Milne studies natural resource struggles and environmental intervention, particularly when it comes to community-based conservation; resource rights initiatives; and market mechanisms for conser

This presentation examines the lived experiences of First Nations cashless debit card holders who experienced digitalisation of their social security payments.

Digitalisation of the welfare state has intensified in recent years, with burdens unevenly distributed between technology advocates and those receiving government income support. Putting in place processes where people needing social security must meet mandatory requirements of digital literacy and divert a significant amount of their small incomes to pay for expensive technologies such as computers, smartphones, and data plans comes at a cost.

This presentation examines lived experiences of First Nations Cashless Debit Card (CDC) holders who experienced digitalisation of their social security payments. Under the CDC, a range of restrictions were placed on purchases, spending social security income came with stigma, technology troubles meant that income was less secure, and Indigenous peoples’ autonomy was undermined. Intensive regulation of their clothing purchases and household goods led to adverse impacts for many cardholders.

Although the CDC has since been abolished, these issues remain relevant as a new cashless social security card, the SmartCard, has been introduced in 2023.

About the speaker

Dr Shelley Bielefeld’s research interests include welfare law and policy, inequality, poverty surveillance, Indigenous law and policy issues, racial discrimination, racial states, disability discrimination, governance and regulation, and human rights. Dr Bielefeld was the Inaugural Braithwaite Research Fellow at the School of Regulation and Global Governance at the Australian National University. Her recent research has been supported by an ARC DECRA: Regulation and Governance for Indigenous Welfare: Poverty Surveillance and its Alternatives (DE180100599) and an ARC Discovery Project: Conditional Welfare: A Comparative Case Study of Income Management Policies (DP180101252). 

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ACT government’s COVID Smart behaviours can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation is a dual-delivery event. Registration is only required for Zoom attendance; registration for in-person attendance is not required as neither the ANU nor ACT Health conduct contact tracing any longer.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Image of banner opposing the Cashless Welfare Debit Card at a 2021 ‘Demand a Living Wage for all’ rally in Melbourne, Victoria, by Matt Hrkac on flickr, free to use under CC BY 2.0 DEED licence.

Singapore’s long history of political imprisonment is a controversial issue, which continues to be silenced and censored by the state. Through discussion of first-hand accounts, this presentation seeks to shed light on the nature of this practice.

About the speaker

Dr Ariel Athwal-Yap is an interdisciplinary lecturer in the School of Law and Criminology at Maynooth University.

Ariel is currently investigating relevant administrative policy and the assemblage of punitive practices that comprise sites of confinement, to provide a better understanding of domestic and international models for dealing with crime.

Ariel’s recent publications include Capital punishment in Singapore; A Review of the Clear Space Online Family online family violence behavioural change program for GBTQ+ men and non-binary people; Trauma – Prolonged and Accumulative: The impact of Singapore detention without trial from the 1948 Malayan Emergency.

She continues to work with the Monash and Oxford Criminology institutes on joint projects.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

Image credit: stylized image of a prisoner behind bars and barbed wire by Jared Rodriguez of Truthout from flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).

However, the declining trade union presence and the absence of autonomous forms of voice place workers and their rights at risk. A majority of women workers in labour intensive apparel industry is considered a source of industrial peace.

Focusing on Sri Lanka’s apparel industry, in post-covid times, this presentation explores how women workers action their collective voice and negotiate their workplace and related rights.

This seminar is Achalie’s final presentation of her doctoral candidature.

About the Speaker

Achalie Kumarage is a lawyer and a PhD Candidate at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) at ANU.

Achalie holds a LL.B. and LL.M. from the Faculty of Law, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka. She completed her second LL.M. at the American University in Washington DC, as a Fulbright scholar. She was a lecturer at the Faculty of Law, University of Colombo before commencing the PhD.

Achalie’s research has been awarded prizes from the American Society of Comparative Law (2019) and the Asian Journal of Law and Society and the Asian Law and Society Association (2022).

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

Image credit: Image of women garment workers in Sri Lanka; supplied by the presenter.

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

An estimated 30,000 asylum seekers have been living for up to ten years under conditions of prolonged uncertainty in Australia, due to freezes and other delays in visa processing. In 2022 and 2023, many began to receive the welcome news that they were to be granted permanent visas. Thus, at short notice, people who had been living under conditions of prolonged precarity found that abiding fears around safety and protection could be set aside, and they were able to access the full range of social protections and supports available to other permanent residents.

This talk addresses the combined consequences of long-term physical and ontological insecurity for former asylum seekers in Australia. Drawing on clinical and social work among asylum seekers, I argue that many will experience new forms of precarity and ontological insecurity after the grant of permanent visa.

This event is presented in person and online. Zoom details below

About the speaker

Christine Phillips is Professor of Social Foundations of Medicine at the School of Medicine and Psychology, College of Health and Medicine. For over two decades she has been Medical Director of Companion House Medical Service, the ACT’s refugee health service, and was a co-founder of the national Refugee Health Network of Australia. She has worked as a consultant with the Australian Government, UNHCR and the World Health Organization over resettlement policies.

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

For online attendance, see Zoom details below

https://anu.zoom.us/j/86557701787?pwd=cnIreVB5eG8vNmlibWtHMjRKaEtIZz09 (Meeting ID: 865 5770 1787. Password: 836061)

Image credit: svetazi on Adobe Stock

Indigenous diplomacy is not limited to global governance and state mechanisms. It is also important for academic institutions such as UBC, where Sheryl championed incorporation of UNDRIP into its strategic plan.

Canada was one four countries which voted against adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) by the United Nations General Assembly on 13 September 2007.

However, Indigenous Peoples’ leadership and diplomacy successfully changed Canada’s position. In 2019, the Canadian province of British Columbia passed legislation to incorporate UNDRIP into its domestic law.

Indigenous diplomacy is not limited to global governance and state mechanisms. It is also important for academic institutions such as UBC, where Sheryl has championed incorporation of UNDRIP into its strategic plan.

This seminar aims to share these experiences and the lessons learned, contributing to the context of Australia, Asia Pacific countries and global governance for Indigenous Peoples.

About the speaker

Sheryl Lightfoot is a Professor in Political Science of the University of British Columbia (UBC) and Canada Research Chair in Global Indigenous Rights and Politics. She was a Senior Advisor to the President on Indigenous Affairs and led implementation of the 2020 Indigenous Strategic Plan across UBC.

As one of the world’s experts in global Indigenous politics, Sheryl specializes in complex questions of Indigenous Peoples’ rights and how they are claimed and negotiated. In 2021 she became the first Indigenous Canadian woman appointed to the United Nations Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (EMRIP) and this year became EMRIP Chair.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

No registration is required for in-person attendance for this event as ANU and ACT Health no longer require registration for the purposes of contact tracing.

This seminar presentation will be a hybrid presentation. It will not be recorded.

Note: unfortunately, a larger capacity venue was unable to be secured for this presentation. It is thus being delivered in hybrid format so it can be accessed online if the venue reaches maximum capacity.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Former UBC President Prof. Santa J. Ono, Dr. Sheryl Lightfoot, Senior Advisor to the President on Indigenous Affairs, and Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde | UBC (2020).

The governance of food systems in Australia is largely fragmented, and tends to focus on singular issues such as exports, food safety, or nutrition at a national level. Less attention is paid to food systems from a holistic perspective, and how local governments are involved. In this presentation, Amy Carrad will discuss what the findings of an ARC Discovery Grant project tell us about the role Australian local governments are playing in food system governance.

The governance of food systems in Australia is largely fragmented, and tends to focus on singular issues such as exports, food safety, or nutrition at a national level. Less attention is paid to food systems from a holistic perspective, and how local governments are involved. In this presentation, Amy Carrad will discuss what the findings of an ARC Discovery Grant project tell us about the role Australian local governments are playing in food system governance.

About the speaker

Amy Carrad is a researcher with a background in public health, health promotion, and organisational change. She is currently a Research Fellow within RegNet, working on the NHMRC Ideas Project ‘Evaluating Systems Change for Health Equity: A Case Study of Australia’s COVID-19 Policy Response’. Prior to joining RegNet, Amy was working on an ARC funded project exploring the role of Australian local governments and civil society organisations in food system governance. She was also the lead research assistant on a large systematic literature review on nutrition labelling policy for the World Health Organization’s Nutrition Guidance Expert Advisory Group.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

Image credit: Photo of waste and recycling bins on suburban Sydney street by Anders Vindegg on flickr under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 licence.

Challenges in emergency contexts, including systemic problems in the humanitarian sector, require dedicated labour to carry out efforts on the ground. Jenna focuses on crisis response in Lebanon to unpack technological and regulatory transformations in humanitarian systems.

Investigating two distinct but intertwined aid systems in the nation — digistised cash-based assistance (e-cards) and emergency response to the Beirut Port explosion — Jenna’s doctoral research answers the following question: in light of recognised critiques of humanitarian efforts, how do actors on the ground work to ensure the viability of humanitarian interventions?

Given the transnational nature of humanitarian response, her findings are informed by a multi-sited ethnography comprised of participant observations and interviews across North America, Europe, and the Middle East. By focusing on the experiences and adaptation strategies of humanitarian employees, refugees, and impoverished residents, she reveals forms of overlooked labour and “repair work” (Steve Jackson, 2014) that are necessary to overcome breakdown in aid interventions.

She draws upon regulatory governance, feminist techno-science, and critical humanitarianism literatures to highlight the relationship between social inequality, regulation, and digitised “solutions” in humanitarian reform and aid delivery.

This seminar is Jenna’s final presentation of her doctoral candidature.

About the speaker

Jenna Imad Harb is a PhD candidate and member of the Justice and Technoscience Lab at the ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Legal Studies and Business, as well as a Master’s degree in Sociology—both from the University of Waterloo.

Jenna’s research examines the intersections of regulation, digital technologies, and crisis response, with particular focus on social justice and the experiences of marginalised groups. She has published in areas of protest surveillance, policing technologies, anti-sexual violence technologies and data protection, and financialised welfare surveillance.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Mural art in Lebanon photographed and supplied by Jenna Harb.

Event Speakers

Jenna Harb_RegNet
Research Fellow

Jenna Imad Harb is a Research Fellow based at RegNet, the School of Regulation and Global Governance at the Australian National University (ANU).

An important part of effectively navigating complexity requires skill in bringing together a variety of perspectives and knowledges related to a system of interest.

However, conflict linked to perceived ‘incommensurability’ of perspectives is also common in such situations, leading to calls for greater research on ‘meta’ methodologies to bring together disparate knowledges.

This presentation outlines recent collaborative ANU research work under a Defence Science and Technology Group, Australian Department of Defence, Philosophy of Operational Research grant to derive principles for participatory process design based on cybernetic and transdisciplinary case studies, as well as reflections on their application in the development of a workshop for supporting Australian Government engagement in Oceania.

About the speaker

Professor Katherine Daniell is a transdisciplinary academic at the ANU’s School of Cybernetics, Fenner School of Environment and Society, and Institute for Water Futures.

Trained in engineering, arts and public policy, her work bridges multiple domains including multi-level governance, cybernetics, participatory processes, river basin management, politics and cultures of innovation, education, and international science and technology cooperation.

Katherine is a John Monash Scholar and convened the innovative ANU Master of Applied Cybernetics from 2019-22. She currently serves in multiple national and international roles, including as President of the French-Australian Association for Research and Innovation. In 2022, she received the insignia of French Chevalier (Knight) in the Ordre National du Mérite.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

Image credit: abstract image of human tweaking cogs in brain cavity from Max Pixel (free to use under CC0 Public Domain license.

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

In our paper, we present a methodology to infer the age and sex profiles of net migration. This research supports the United Nations Population Division’s estimation and population projection procedures for producing the World Population Prospects (WPP). Age and sex profiles of net migration are required as inputs into demographic accounting models for population estimation and projection. However, most countries in the world do not directly measure migration and residual methods for inferring the patterns have proven inadequate, due to errors in the measures of populations, births and deaths.

As net migration does not exhibit regularities across age and sex, we developed a strategy to first estimate flows of immigration and emigration by age and sex, which do exhibit regularities. Differences from these estimates are then calculated to obtain net international migration by age and sex. Based on empirical tests, using data from Sweden, South Korea, Australia, Canada and New Zealand, the methodology shows great promise for overcoming a major data limitation countries around the world. Further, we apply the model to countries where the age and sex patterns of net migration are unknown and show the results. The paper ends with a discussion of next steps and further extensions.

This event is presented in person and online. Zoom details below.

Speaker
James Raymer is a Professor of Demography at the Australian National University. His research focuses on developing innovative methodologies and analytical frameworks to study migration processes. His current research focuses on estimating international migration flows in the Asia Pacific region and small area population projections in Australia. For the past four years, he has been an active participant in the United Nations’ Expert Group on Migration Statistics.

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

For online attendance, see Zoom details below https://anu.zoom.us/j/86557701787?pwd=cnIreVB5eG8vNmlibWtHMjRKaEtIZz09
(Meeting ID: 865 5770 1787. Password: 836061)

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

This event is presented in person and online. Zoom details below

About the speakers

Associate Professor Kate Ogg ANU College of Law, Associate Professor and Associate Dean (Higher Degree Research)

Dr Jessica Hambly Senior Lecturer at the ANU College of Law, and Co-Director of the Law Reform and Social Justice program

Associate Professor Matt Zagor ANU College of Law, Associate Professor and Director of the Law Reform and Social Justice program

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

For online attendance, see Zoom details below https://anu.zoom.us/j/86557701787?pwd=cnIreVB5eG8vNmlibWtHMjRKaEtIZz09
(Meeting ID: 865 5770 1787. Password: 836061)

Image credit: Tierney on Adobe Stock

What does it mean for a city to be restorative, why would this be a good thing, and how can we make it happen?

In November 2019, Canberra officially committed to becoming a “restorative city”. The idea of a restorative city emerged in the 2000s and has since gained momentum around the world. This seminar introduces the concept of a restorative city, outlines its potential for promoting social cohesion, and unpacks some of the challenges of realising a restorative city vision.

About the speaker

Dr Janet Hope graduated from the ANU in 1996 with first class honours degrees in Biochemistry and Law. For several years she worked as a barrister and solicitor in Australia and New Zealand. After earning her PhD at RegNet in 2005 in intellectual property law and policy, she stayed on as an ARC Postdoctoral Fellow and Senior Fellow until 2010.

Janet left academia in 2010 to support a relative who had suffered severe complex trauma as a result of violent crime. Through this work, she decided to train as a professional coach. Janet now maintains a Professional Certified Coach credential from the International Coaching Federation. Before joining Canberra Law School in 2020, she ran a private practice offering coaching for conflict resolution.

Janet is currently Senior Lecturer at Canberra Law School, convening Administrative Law and Criminal Justice. She joined the Canberra Restorative Community in 2017 and is developing a research program in the field of restorative justice.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Photo of Canberra from top of Mount Ainslie by Sam Ilić from flickr, used under (CC BY-NC 2.0) licence.

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

This research seeks to understand the extent that migrant characteristics (such as age, gender, education and English language skills, geographic location, permanent visa category, temporary visa history and country of birth) can predict the economic outcomes or Australian permanent migrants. This analysis is conducted using data from the Multi-Agency Data Integration Project (MADIP).

The research uses three main techniques: Descriptive analysis that visually presents the aggregate economic outcomes of migrants in the years following the grant of a permanent visa. ‘Mincer’ regressions that estimate the marginal impact of covariates on migrant outcomes. These regressions can answer questions such as “If other factors were held equal, how much more does a migrant with a university degree earn compared to one that has not completed high school?”

Oaxaca-Blinder analysis that decomposes the difference in economic outcomes between groups of migrants into components that can be explained by different observable characteristics and unobservable and unexplained components. These decompositions can answer questions such as “how much of the higher income level of Employer Sponsored Migrants can be explained by higher levels of education or English language skills?” and “How much more do Employer Sponsored migrants earn compared to other migrants that can’t be explained by observable characteristics?”

This presentation will also briefly cover two extensions. The first compares the determinants of migrants’ outcomes with similar analysis for the non-migrant population. The second examines how well nominated income predicts the incomes of Employer Sponsored migrants and the extent to which migrants with higher levels of nominated income are explained through observable characteristics.

This event is presented in person and online. Please see Zoom details below.

About the speakers

Professor Robert Breunig, is the director of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute at the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy. From 2015 to 2016 he was the Director of the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.

Dr Peter Varela is a Research Fellow at the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute with a focus on the economics of migration and tax policy. Prior to joining the TTPI, Peter has worked at the Australian Treasury, the Australian Productivity Commission and the Centre for International Economics.

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

For online attendance, see Zoom details below:
https://anu.zoom.us/j/86557701787?pwd=cnIreVB5eG8vNmlibWtHMjRKaEtIZz09
(Meeting ID: 865 5770 1787. Password: 836061)

Photo credit: By Lightfield Studios on Adobe Stock

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

The humanitarian crisis on the EU-Belarus border has been unfolding since mid-2021, mostly out of public sight. Increasingly anxious about the raising numbers of people dying on the forested border, the EU came to realize that “this is the moment now for a European migration management policy” to gain speed (Ursula von der Leyen). In the meantime, Poland, Lithuania, and Latvia declared a state of emergency, accusing Belarussian President Lukashenko of using migrants as weapons for a hybrid war aimed to threaten the security of the EU.

In June 2022, Poland completed a 5.5-metre-high steel wall on a 186-kilometre border to deter migrants entering from Belarus. Yet, the wall has neither stopped migrants nor prevented unnecessary deaths, illegal pushbacks or violence. Today, the tough measures employed at the border continue to be seen, on the one hand, as flagrant violation of human rights, and on the other hand, as necessary and unavoidable. And while Europe can indeed step up to a challenge – as it’s response to millions of Ukrainians fleeing Russia’s invasion has shown – it can also, and at the same time, rationalize the crisis and accept the normalization of violence.

This event is presented in person and online. Please see Zoom details below.

About the speaker

Dr Katarzyna K Williams is Deputy Director of the ANU Centre for European Studies. Her research focuses on migrant cultures and diaspora, particularly life narratives, issues of displacement and transcultural experience. She is also interested in memory studies, memorialization and the politics of memory.

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

For online attendance, see Zoom details below:
https://anu.zoom.us/j/86557701787?pwd=cnIreVB5eG8vNmlibWtHMjRKaEtIZz09
(Meeting ID: 865 5770 1787. Password: 836061)

Photo credit: By Marcin on Adobe Stock

In this mid-term doctoral candidature presentation, Walter explores the social and political dynamics of the emerging system of global governance for neurotechnologies.

Neurotechnologies are a set of technologies which can interact with the brain, spine, or peripheral nerves in various ways. Over about the last five years, ethical and policy issues around neurotechnologies have become the subject of significant global discussions, even in the absence of an organised social movement or acute scandal.

Drawing on the nodal governance and ecology literatures, this presentation explores the social and political dynamics involved in opening a ‘de novo’ space of global governance around neurotechnologies. In doing so, preliminary findings will be reported from data collected from interviews, participant observation, and archival research.

This seminar is Walter’s mid-term doctoral candidature presentation.

About the speaker

Walter G. Johnson is a PhD scholar at RegNet. Prior to joining RegNet, he completed a JD and research fellowship at Arizona State University focusing on analysing the ethical, social, and legal aspects of emerging technologies including mitochondrial donation.

Walter’s research examines the law, policy, and politics of governing current and emerging technologies with the overarching goal of promoting health, safety, and equity. His current thesis project explores the sociolegal and political dynamics of the emerging system of global governance forming around neurotechnologies.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation is dual-delivery. Please register if you wish to attend by Zoom.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Abstract illustration of human brain, face and radiating waves by geralt on pixabay, free to use under pixabay licence.

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

 

The perspectives of ethnic-minority and migrant-background women are pivotal to understanding the history of multiculturalism as an access and equity issue. This paper draws on oral histories conducted with welfare advocates and migrant women in Sydney and Melbourne, in combination with archival records and government funded reports on migrant industrial workers and welfare concerns from the 1970s to the 1990s.

The research is part of a broader project that historicises the development of welfare and social service delivery to culturally and linguistically diverse communities in Australia, beginning with the perspectives of grassroots advocates and community welfare workers in the 1970s. In that economic and social context, they were concerned with: the availability of culturally appropriate and accessible occupation health and safety measures; workplace entitlements for migrant workers and their families (including workplace rehabilitation and compensation); and broader health (including mental health) care access for non-English-speaking background communities.

The issues they tackled were complex and, in many ways, remain prescient nearly fifty years since the introduction of a national multicultural policy, and state multicultural bureaucracies.

This event is presented in person and online. Zoom details below

About the Speaker

Dr Alexandra Dellios is a historian and Senior Lecturer in the Centre for Heritage and Museum Studies at the Australian National University. She teaches cultural heritage management and oral history, and has published on popular representations of multiculturalism; immigration centres and hostels; the intersections of migrant, industrial and labour heritage; migrant public history practices.

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

For online attendance, see Zoom details below
https://anu.zoom.us/j/86557701787?pwd=cnIreVB5eG8vNmlibWtHMjRKaEtIZz09 (Meeting ID: 865 5770 1787. Password: 836061)

Photo credit: sewing machine by Kohei Take purchased from Adobe Stock 467633988

How do policy actors go about influencing financing policy in Australia’s Health Care system, and what does this mean for the healthcare system?

Policy change does not exist in a vacuum. This research explores the role of a network of actors in locking down the financing mechanisms in the health system in Australia. The aim is to gain a better understanding of the influence of the network of policy actors (advocates, lobbyists) on the health care system.

Structural changes have been implemented in other countries, however, attempts to alter the financing rules that would incentivise greater integration in Australia have not been successful. This research analyses three major attempts to vertically integrate healthcare, reduce fragmentation and increase the efficiency of the system through altering what funders can pay and how they can pay for it.

Based on a unique application of the concepts of path dependency, resource dependency and network methods, this research found that actors formed coalitions that established two broad roles: those attempting to alter the payment and access rules, or those attempting to cement them. Across the three attempts, the structure of the network altered, however key players remained in control of their coalition. The coalition that prevented change consistently demonstrated an ability to control the system, demonstrating that regulation of the rules sat outside government.

Successive governments appear to have been constrained from reforming the financing rules and seem to have lost interest in major reforms in this space. This is unfortunate for consumers who have indicated that they want an integrated system but did not coalesce as one group to find a voice to make a clear ‘ask’ of any government on how this could be achieved.

To effect policy change the research suggests that a number of criteria should be present:

a. develop a set of policies that can clearly fund the cost of the change for medical providers, funders and consumers;

b. ensure consumers are supported to find a voice to develop a position during the debate;

c. and either have the AMA, or a very strong coalition supporting.

This is Jodette’s final presentation of her doctoral candidature.

About the speaker

Jodette Katz has over 25 years’ experience in both the public and non-government sectors. She was previously the CEO of Parkinson’s Australia and is now currently advising the Government on funding strategies for the Aged Care system. She has extensive knowledge and practical skills in policy development and analysis, advocacy, strategic communications planning, political relations and social media. She is passionate about improving health outcomes in Australia and globally.

Jodette has a Master of Public Health (Research) from the Australian National University.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Illustration of stylized human figures in networks, by opensource.com from flickr, (CC BY-SA 2.0) licence.

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

In this presentation Annika will engage with the question of what role migration researchers might play in creating a more nuanced understanding of the backlash against refugees and migrants following the summer of displacements 2015 in Europe. Annika will suggest that due to its closeness to people’s everyday processes of meaning-making, ethnographic research can play a crucial role in understanding the xenophobic, anti-cosmopolitan and illiberal sentiments that are currently sweeping through European societies. This, however, means that migration scholars need to overcome their traditional reluctance of studying groups they cannot sympathise with.

By reflecting on her previous and on-going research Annika will show why, after a decade of studying refugees’ struggles for emplacement in Western host societies, she decided to “change sides” and study the experiences of people who believe that the influx of refugees is a threat to their values and ways of life. Annika will argue that if we are to understand the current backlash against liberal and cosmopolitan ideas we need to pay attention to genealogies of exclusionary practices, or “cultures of unwelcome”.

This event is presented in person and online. Please see Zoom details below.

About the speaker

Dr Annika Lems is a senior lecturer in anthropology at the School of Archaeology & Anthropology at the Australian National University. Her work broadly concerns the ways people experience, negotiate and actively create place attachments in an age of rapid global transformations. This has included research on Somali refugees’ placemaking practices in Melbourne, unaccompanied refugee minors navigating the Swiss asylum landscape and exclusionary ideas of belonging to place in the Austrian Alps. She has published extensively, including two monographs: Being-Here: Placemaking in a World of Movement (Berghahn, 2018) and Frontiers of Belonging: The Education of Unaccompanied Refugee Youth (Indiana University Press, 2022).

This series is spearheaded by the ANU Migration Hub hosted at RegNet, in collaboration with the School of Archaeology and Anthropology.

For online attendance, see Zoom details below:
https://anu.zoom.us/j/86557701787?pwd=cnIreVB5eG8vNmlibWtHMjRKaEtIZz09
(Meeting ID: 865 5770 1787. Password: 836061)

Photo credit: By adzicnatasa on Adobe Stock

How are countries using state-owned banks to accelerate (or hinder) the global energy transition away from fossil fuels? Maxfield presents new interview evidence on what governments are (and are not) doing to move taxpayer dollars away from financing dirty energy.

As climate change and geopolitical tensions place pressures on governments to respond with industrial policy interventions, export-credit agencies (ECAs), or government-owned banks that support national exports through subsidized credit, are being swiftly repositioned as part of national climate, economic, and security strategies.

However, tensions between the preferences of domestic political interest groups and global governance regimes are impacting the ways and extent to which different ECAs are responding to these changes. Leveraging interview evidence with senior ECA officials in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and France, compiled with Christian Downie, Maxfield Peterson will present new findings on the ways in which these public financial institutions are reshaping global politics and energy finance.

About the speakers

Dr. Maxfield Peterson joined the ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance in 2022. Max is a political scientist whose work investigates questions at the intersection of governance, political economy, energy politics, and international development.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: wind and solar renewable energy sources by seagul on pixabay, free to use under pixabay licence.

Violent and armed conflict in Hela Province has significantly worsened over the past few years, despite the continued efforts of various development organisations in trying to make a difference to the situation.

Yet grassroots, locally-led peacebuilding efforts do exist in Hela, and the speakers argue that the most effective way for outside organisations to engage with these problems is to identify and support the considerable indigenous expertise that already exists on the ground.

In April 2022 the US identified PNG as a partner country under the US Global Fragility Strategy. This presents an opportunity for a new type of engagement in PNG, and Hela Province in particular.

About the speakers

James Komengi is from Tari, the capital of Hela Province. James has spent many years devoted to peacebuilding initiatives in his home province and has worked with international partners including DFAT and UNDP on programs related to violent conflict.

Michael Main completed his PhD in anthropology at ANU in 2020, for which he conducted long-term research in Tari and Komo with a focus on understanding armed conflict in Hela as well as cultural expressions and impacts of trauma.

This seminar presentation will be online via Zoom only.

Image credit: Armed clan near Komo, Hela Province, Papua New Guinea, photographed and supplied by Michael Main.

From the global geopolitical arena to the smart city, control over knowledge — particularly over data and intellectual property — has become a key battleground for the exercise of economic and political power.

From the global geopolitical arena to the smart city, control over knowledge - particularly over data and intellectual property — has become a key battleground for the exercise of economic and political power. For companies and governments alike, control over knowledge — what scholar Susan Strange calls the knowledge structure — has become a goal unto itself. The rising dominance of the knowledge structure is leading to a massive redistribution of power, including from individuals to companies and states.

The new knowledge: information, data and the remaking of global power is a guide to and analysis of these changes, and of the emerging phenomenon of the knowledge-driven society. It highlights how the pursuit of the control over knowledge has become its own ideology, with its own set of experts drawn from those with the ability to collect and manipulate digital data. Haggart and Tusikov propose a workable path forward — knowledge decommodification — to ensure that our new knowledge is not treated simply as a commodity to be bought and sold, but as a way to meet the needs of the individuals and communities that create this knowledge in the first place.

About the authors

Blayne Haggart is an associate professor of political science at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada. He is a Senior Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation and a Senior Fellow at the Balsillie School of International Affairs in Waterloo, Ontario. He is the author of Copyfight: The Global Politics of Digital Copyright Reform (2014) and co-editor of two volumes on the political economy of internet governance and knowledge governance, in addition to several journal articles on these subjects.

Natasha Tusikov is an associate professor in the Department of Social Science at York University in Toronto and a visiting fellow with the Justice and Technoscience Lab (JusTech Lab), School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) at the Australian National University. Her research examines the intersection among law, crime, technology, and regulation. She is the author of Chokepoints: Global Private Regulation on the Internet (2017). She is a co-editor of Information, Technology and Control in a Changing World: Understanding Power Structures in the 21st Century (2019) and co-editor of Power and Authority in Internet Governance: Return of the State? (2021).

Image credit: ‘The new knowledge: information, data and the remaking of global power’ book cover supplied by Natasha Tusikov.

This is a presentation of Charlotte’s work-in-progress article which analyses how EU policymakers relate ‘health’ and ‘economic growth’ in pandemic recovery strategies.

 

The health of economies and that of people are related. How this relationship is best governed, however, is contested. EU policymakers must make sense of this relationship when developing pandemic recovery strategies. One point of contention relates to whether economic growth is a necessary precondition for a healthier population.

The mainstream assumption is that economic growth is good and necessary for population health, provided it is ‘green’ and ‘inclusive’. But heterodox research highlights the fundamental unsustainability – and health-harming effects – of seeking continuous economic growth in a world of finite resources.

Amidst this landscape of contested knowledge, this article maps out the discourses relating health and growth in pandemic recovery-related documents in four EU institutions (Commission, Parliament, Council, and the European Central Bank) over three years (2020-2022). Using discourse network analysis (DNA), it presents a visualisation of the relationship between prevailing ideas on economic recovery and health.

This is a work-in-progress presentation.

About the speaker

Charlotte Godziewski is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in International Politics at City, University of London. Her research explores the politics of health, with a current empirical focus on the EU. Her doctoral thesis was awarded the 2021 Best PhD Thesis Prize by the University Association for Contemporary European Studies (UACES). Charlotte is a coordinator of ‘EUHealthGov’, the UACES-funded research network on EU Health Governance, and an Associate Editor of Health Promotion International.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Photo of KN90 mask against a background of € notes and coins, by romanakr on pixabay, free to use under pixabay licence.

In this special event, Lilly Be’soer, Director of the NGO Voice for Change in Jiwaka province, PNG, will discuss the work of grassroots peace-building.

In this special event, Lilly Be’soer, Director of the non-governmental organization (NGO) Voice for Change in Jiwaka province, Papua New Guinea, will discuss the work of grassroots peace-building.

Lilly will discuss the challenges of security and violence in the region and the strategies that her NGO has developed in building sustainable peace and mediating conflicts. She will also discuss the multi-scalar ways that NGOs are required to engage with local communities, provincial and national governments and also international partners.

About the speaker

Lilly Be’Soer is founder and director of Voice for Change, PNG.

Read more about Lilly at this Pacific Community 70 Inspiring Pacific Women profile.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Screengrab of Lilly Be’soer from Voice for Change PNG homepage, used with Lilly’s permission.

This research aims to understand the role of non-state actors in the formation of new international treaties, applying a case study approach to understand what factors lead to the success of transnational advocacy network campaigns for new treaty instruments across multiple policy domains.

Fossil fuels are responsible for 86% of carbon dioxide emissions, however until relatively recently, the dominant focus of both domestic and international climate policy has centred on curbing demand, with limited national or international attempts to regulate the supply of fossil fuels. To address this challenge, the ‘Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty Initiative’ was launched in 2020, advocating for a treaty focused on non-proliferation, disarmament, and a just transition towards renewable energy.

The Fossil Fuel Treaty Initiative is the latest in a long line of examples of transnational advocacy networks aimed at securing the negotiation of new treaties in international law. In recent decades, coordinated social movements have played a key role in the formation of treaty instruments in the humanitarian, environmental, health and human rights fields.

However, while it is increasingly recognised that non-state actors have a role to play in international law, there is relatively limited research on the role of transnational advocacy networks in the formation of new treaty instruments.

This research applies a case study approach, drawing on process tracing, actor network mapping and participatory action research methodologies, to understand what factors lead to the success of transnational advocacy network campaigns for new treaty instruments across multiple policy domains. It aims to provide a theoretical contribution to the literature by identifying and explaining the role of transnational advocacy networks in treaty-making.

This seminar presentation is Rebecca’s Thesis Proposal Review, in which she presents her thesis proposal to her supervisors, peers and other RegNet scholars.

About the speaker

Rebecca Byrnes is a PhD Scholar focusing on the role of transnational advocacy networks in the formation of new international law instruments. She simultaneously works with the Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty Initiative, which is itself a transnational advocacy network working towards a new treaty governing fossil fuel production. Rebecca has Masters degrees in Law, and Environmental Change and Management from the University of Oxford, and has previously worked in the NSW Government and the Grantham Research Institute at the London School of Economics.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only. It is open only to RegNet academics, staff, students and visitors.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Image of a rally for a Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty at the United Nations Environment Program Stockholm+50 conference, from Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty Initiative 3 June 2022 press release.

How are Pacific governments responding to the growing challenge of environmental migration and displacement?

In 2022, 32.6 million people fled their homes in response to environmental stressors, which disproportionately affect Pacific communities and households (IDMC, 2023; IPCC, 2018). So, how are Pacific governments responding to the growing challenge of environmental migration and displacement?

The project adopted the human geography method of ‘following policy’ to trace the emergence of ‘best practices’ in the issue area. By interviewing and observing policy experts operating at multiple sites and scales, the project identified three approaches to regulating environmental migration and displacement: planned relocation, labour migration and humanitarian protection.

It seeks to explain variation in the extent to which these ‘models’ have become institutionally embedded in the Pacific. In doing so, the study contributes to theories of policy mobility.

This seminar is Lakshmin’s final presentation of her doctoral candidature.

About the speaker

Lakshmin Mudaliar is a geographer and a PhD candidate at the School of Regulation and Global Governance at the Australian National University. She holds a Bachelor of Science, Post-Graduate Diploma of Science and Master of Science from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Image of a sign on South Tarawa, Kiribati, warning of the threat of sea level rise to the island, with its highest point being 3 metres above sea level, from Wikipedia Commons(CC BY 2.0).

Australia is contending with a slew of new facial recognition technologies and their uses, in the context of regulatory gaps and insufficient understanding of the historical, social, and cultural contexts in which they are used.

Australia is contending with a slew of new facial recognition technologies and their uses, in the context of regulatory gaps and insufficient understanding of the historical, social, and cultural contexts in which they are used.

Conversations about best practices for governing facial recognition systems at both the design and application levels are largely motivated by research ethics, competitive industry advantage, and public accountability to citizens, not the advantage of the people whose facial data will be fuelling facial recognition.

Considering the expanding scope of facial recognition uses, these discussions put into question the meaning of best practices and how to implement them. For example, regulatory gaps allow facial recognition technologies to be used intrusively and covertly.

The project is built on 30 qualitative multi-stakeholder interviews with government, corporate, and academic respondents, the data thematically analysed. The findings suggest that the governance of facial recognition technologies requires a comprehensive framework of laws, including a reform of the ongoing Privacy Act and a national law or charter of human rights at the first instance.

Furthermore, the study calls into question what “best practices” constitute in the national context of Australia, in particular considering the impacts on Indigenous Australians.

About the speaker

Dr Ausma Bernot is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Australian Graduate School of Policing & Security, Charles Sturt University.

Ausma’s doctoral research explored the dynamic interaction between surveillance technologies and social context and questions totalisation of surveillance in China. Her current research focuses on the effects that the merging of infotech and biotech triggers in the fields of governance, surveillance, policing, and public safety.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Illustration of a mobile phone scanning a geometrically stylized face by Mike MacKenzie on flickr (CC by 2.0 licence)

We are witnessing a rapid diffusion of so-called “generative AI”—that is, machine learning technologies that simulate human languages, communication, arts, and cultural expression through the statistical modelling of vast troves of internet data. 

We are witnessing a rapid diffusion of so-called “generative AI”—that is, machine learning technologies that simulate human languages, communication, arts, and cultural expression through the statistical modelling of vast troves of internet data. This rise has generated questions about the prospective impact on creative practice, knowledge production and methods of learning. Concerns around copyright infringement, misinformation, plagiarism and the spread of harmful content have highlighted how these machine learning systems can create and exacerbate forms of injustice and inequity. What, then, can be done to foster proactive responses to these issues? Can different approaches to design help ensure these technologies work in the public interest and are safe, accountable and inclusive to the wide range of communities who engage them?

Join an interdisciplinary panel of international AI researchers to discuss these emerging shifts and their implications for design and questions of justice.

Panel (3:30-5pm)

Chair: Kate Henne (Director of RegNet, School of Regulation and Global Governance, ANU)

Panelists: Michelle Jasper (Cybernetics, ANU), Katrina Sluis (Photography and Media Arts, ANU), Matthew Stone (Computer Science, Rutgers University), Wesley Taylor (Graphic Design, Virginia Commonwealth University)

Reception (5-6:30pm)

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please contact the event organiser.

Funded by the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes as part of the “Design Justice AI Global Humanities Institute

Image credit: Image by Alan Warburton / © BBC / Better Images of AI / Virtual Human / CC-BY 4.0

How have Latin American countries integrated patent protection and sustainable development?

Policy integration is one of the main challenges in promoting sustainable development. Global governance mechanisms, such as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), highlight the importance of coordinating different policies to promote effective outcomes. However, these mechanisms often overlook how trade regulation, such as patent protection, impacts sustainability.

Patent protection can affect the achievement of several SDGs, including public health, energy transition, and food security. While granting monopoly rights to patent holders can incentivise local innovation, it can also affect how developing countries access technologies crucial for sustainable development.

Employing a mixed-method research design and drawing on international and comparative political economy theories, Alex’s PhD research interrogates how Latin American countries have promoted sustainability goals in recent patent regulation. His research identifies the conditions that enable the integration of patent protection and sustainable development and demonstrates how competing public and private interests shape policymaking for sustainability.

This seminar is Alex’s final presentation of his doctoral candidature.

About the speaker

Alex San Martim Portes is a PhD Scholar at the Australian National University’s School of Regulation and Global Governance. His research focuses on the intersection of trade regulation and socioeconomic/sustainable development. He investigates how trade agreements affect developing countries’ capacity to design public policy and how emerging forms of domestic regulation affect international trade. Alex is an interdisciplinary researcher who studies international political economy, intellectual property rights, trade law, climate change, human rights, sustainability, and mixed-methods.

This seminar presentation will be online-only.

Image credit: Abstract illustration of patent process flowchart by Adrienne Yancey for opensource.com, from flickr, used under CC BY-SA 2.0 licence

This informal talk will explain how the International Court of Justice (ICJ) works, focussing on its deliberative methods.

This informal talk will explain how the International Court of Justice (ICJ) works, focussing on its deliberative methods.

This presentation is jointly hosted by the Centre for International Governance and Justice, School of Regulation and Governance (RegNet), ANU and the Centre for International and Public Law, College of Law, ANU.

About the speaker

Hilary Charlesworth is Harrison Moore Professor and Melbourne Laureate Professor at Melbourne Law School. She is also Honorary Professor at RegNet. She held an ARC Federation Fellowship from 2005-2010 and an ARC Laureate Fellowship from 2010-2015.

Her research includes the structure of the international legal system, peacebuilding, human rights law and international humanitarian law, international legal theory, particularly feminist approaches to international law and the art of international law.

Hilary was elected to the Institut de Droit International in 2011 and she was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the Université Catholique de Louvain in Belgium in 2016. She has served as a Judge of the International Court of Justice since late 2021.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

No registration is required for this event as ANU and ACT Health no longer require registration for the purposes of contact tracing.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: View of the ICJ courtroom on 1 December 2022, at the reading of the Judgement of the Court in the Dispute over the Status and Use of the Waters of the Silala (Chile v. Bolivia), from the ICJ website (free to use for educational institutions per ICJ Media Services Item C conditions).

Reynol’s dissertation examines the implementation of restorative justice in the context of Taiwanese juvenile justice.

Reynol’s dissertation examines the implementation of restorative justice in the context of Taiwanese juvenile justice.

Given the relational nature of restorative justice, his findings are based on participant observation and interviews with a wide range of respondents, including people responsible, people harmed, their supporters, and justice practitioners such as judges and facilitators. Theoretically informed by Reintegrative Shaming Theory, Transformative Mediation Studies and Confucian Relationalism Studies, this research reveals a form of shame transformation and a pluralistic justice system.

This seminar is Reynol’s mid-term doctoral presentation.

About the speaker

Reynol Cheng is a PhD candidate at the ANU RegNet. Prior to joining RegNet, he was a police inspector and restorative justice facilitator in Taiwan. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in Police Administration and a Master’s degree in Gender Studies from Taiwan, and an Honours degree in Criminology from the University of Tasmania.

Reynol’s research explores restorative justice, gender equality and relationality, with a particular focus on juvenile justice and the experiences of marginalised groups. The aim of Reynol’s work is to build bridges that promote understanding between different communities and to collaborate on innovations that can contribute to social harmony.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be a hybrid presentation.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Illustration of Taiwanese flag in a fingerprint pattern by CatsWithGlasses on pixabay (free to use under pixabay licence); ‘Restorative Justice’ Chinese calligraphy output from https://chinese.gratis, used with permission.

This presentation explores an integrative framework, called the risk, reward and resilience framework, which synthesizes insights from diverse disciplines and domains.

THIS SEMINAR WAS OIRGINALLY PUBLISHED WITH THE TITLE RISK, REWARD, AND RESILIENCE – APPLYING AI AND LLMs. THE PRESENTER, TITLE AND CONTENT OF THE SEMINAR HAS SINCE CHANGED.

Striking a balance between risk, reward, and resilience is now the centre of many public discussions and policy-making around the world. Addressing complex policy challenges is difficult as they are inherently complex, crossing disciplinary silos and departmental divides.

This presentation explores an integrative framework, called the RRR framework, which synthesizes insights from diverse disciplines and domains. It provides a new mental model for thinking about and working through cross-cutting issues across a variety of topics.

About the speaker

Anthea Roberts, a Professor at RegNet, is an interdisciplinary researcher and legal scholar who focuses on new ways of thinking about complex and evolving global fields. Her research areas include international law, trade and investment, the effect of geopolitical change on global governance, and understanding and navigating complex systems. She is the creator of the Risk, Reward and Resilience Framework for dealing with complex policy issues that require integrative approaches.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image of female robot head against a background of programming code by Gerd Altmann on pixabay, free to use under pixabay licence.

Examining how social movement organisations mobilise shareholders, bank customers, superfund members and other investors to express their political values through their investment decisions.

 

Social movement organisations mobilise shareholders and other investors to lobby corporations on a range of issues including climate change, modern slavery, and migration, utilising tactics including shareholder resolutions, divestment, boycotts, legal action, and naming and shaming campaigns.

Existing conceptualisations of these acts relegate them to business management scholarship or conflate them with political consumerism, failing to capture the unique political role of investors.

In this seminar, Erin presents a conceptualisation of ‘political investorism’ as a cohering term for investment-based political participation. Drawing upon a study of political investorism in Australia, Erin considers the opportunity structures that shape political investorism, and the insider/outsider dynamics of this form of lobbying, identifying a new category of ‘unnatural insider.’

About the speaker

Dr Erin O’Brien is an ARC DECRA Fellow and Associate Professor in Policy and Politics in the School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology. Her research examines political advocacy, lobbying, and participation, with a particular focus on market-based activism.

Her DECRA Fellowship project investigates the framing of responsibility between the state, civil society, and market actors for addressing complex multi-jurisdictional issues, specifically modern slavery. Prior to entering academia, Dr O’Brien worked in strategic communications in the government and not-for-profit sectors in Australia and the United Kingdom.

COVID protocols

The ANU strongly encourages you to keep a mask with you at all times (for use when COVID-19 safe behaviours are not practicable) and to be respectful of colleagues, students and visitors who may wish to continue to wear one. Please continue to practice good hygiene. If you are unwell, please stay home. The ANU’s COVID Safety advice can be accessed here.

This seminar presentation will be in-person only.

If you require accessibility accommodations or a visitor Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan please email regnet.communications@anu.edu.au.

Image credit: Greenpeace protest at Nestle Annual General Meeting on flickr, (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 licence).