patents

Emerging markets and the world patent order

Author/s (editor/s):

Abott, Frederick M (ed)
Correa, Carlos M (ed)
Drahos, Peter (ed)

Publication year:

2015

Publication type:

Book

The patent has emerged as a dominant force in 21st century economic policy. This book examines the impact of the BRICS and other emerging economies on the global patent framework and charts the phenomenal rise in the number of patents in some of these countries.

Guided by three of the world’s leading thinkers on patent law and development, a group of experts from around the world, including the BRICS and key developed country patent powers, examine critical issues raised by patent globalization. Is increasing use of the patent system in China, India, Brazil and other emerging markets part of a deeper change in world technological leadership? Do the established patent powers of Europe, Japan and the USA continue to lead regulatory development of patent systems or are new models being formed in emerging markets? What are the effects of patent globalization on regions like the Middle East, Africa and lower income areas of Asia? Through the answers to these questions, the reader is furnished with a rounded understanding of 21st century patent globalization and emerging market dynamics.

This book will appeal to patent law specialists, as well as scholars interested in the intersection between patents, innovation and economic development. In particular, the in-depth analysis would also be useful for policy analysts within government or research institutes working on patent policy issues.

Cite the publication as

Abott Frederick M. Abbott, Edward Ball and Peter Drahos (eds) (2015). Emerging Markets and the World Patent Order. 2nd ed. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Gene cartels: Biotech patents in the age of free trade

Author/s (editor/s):

Palombi, Luigi

Publication year:

2009

Publication type:

Book

Starting with the 13th century, this book explores how patents have been used as an economic protectionist tool, developing and evolving to the point where thousands of patents have been ultimately granted not over inventions, but over isolated or purified biological materials. DNA, invented by no man and once thought to be `free to all men and reserved exclusively to none’, has become cartelised in the hands of multinational corporations. The author questions whether the continuing grant of patents can be justified when they are now used to suppress, rather than promote, research and development in the life sciences. Luigi Palombi demonstrates that patents are about inventions and not isolated biological materials, which consequently have no bona fide purpose in the innovations of biotechnological science. This book will be important reading for anyone who has an interest in the role that patents have played in economic development - particularly historians, economists and scientists. It will also be of great interest to law academics, lawyers, judges and policymakers.

Cite the publication as

Palombi, Luigi, 2009. Gene cartels: Biotech patents in the age of free trade. UK, Cheltenham; USA, Northamton: Edward Elgar Publishing.

The global governance of knowledge: Patent offices and their clients

Author/s (editor/s):

Drahos, Peter

Publication year:

2010

Publication type:

Book

Find this publication at:
http://www.cambridge.org/gb/knowledge/isbn/item2705464/

Patent offices around the world have granted millions of patents to multinational companies. Patent offices are rarely studied and yet they are crucial agents in the global knowledge economy. Based on a study of forty-five rich and poor countries that takes in the world’s largest and smallest offices, Peter Drahos argues that patent offices have become part of a globally integrated private governance network, which serves the interests of multinational companies, and that the Trilateral Offices of Europe, the USA and Japan make developing country patent offices part of the network through the strategic fostering of technocratic trust. By analysing the obligations of patent offices under the patent social contract and drawing on a theory of nodal governance, the author proposes innovative approaches to patent office administration that would allow developed and developing countries to recapture the public spirit of the patent social contract.

Cite the publication as

Drahos, Peter, 2010. The global governance of knowledge: Patent offices and their clients. United States of America, New York: Cambridge University Press.

Death of patents

Author/s (editor/s):

Drahos, Peter

Publication year:

2005

Publication type:

Book

Find this publication at:
http://www.wildy.com/isbn/9780953940325/death-of-patents-

National patent systems have stopped serving the ideal of public benefit. Instead the world is moving towards a universal patent system that will only make a few rich countries even richer. The various chapters in this book, written by leading scholars in the field, show how national patent systems have been compromised. Doctrinal developments in patent law no longer square with the public good.The requirement of inventiveness in patent law no longer complements what we know about creativity and may in fact stand in the way of inventiveness and innovation. The standard moral justifications for the patent system that we now have simply do not work. The erosion of national sovereignty over the setting of patent standards means that increasingly most nation states will be hampered in their use of patents as a tool of industry policy.Death of Patent System details these and other changes in national patent systems.

Cite the publication as

Drahos, Peter, 2005. Death of patents. Oxton:Lawtext Publishing.

Updated:  10 August 2017/Responsible Officer:  Director, RegNet/Page Contact:  Director, RegNet