trade

How does policy framing enable or constrain inclusion of social determinants of health and health equity on trade policy agendas?

Author/s (editor/s):

Belinda Townsend
Ashley Schram
Fran Baum
Ronald Labonte
Sharon Friel

Publication year:

2018

Publication type:

Journal article

Find this publication at:
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09581596.2018.1509059

Trade agreements influence the distribution of money, goods, services and daily living conditions – the social determinants of health and health equity, which ultimately impacts differentially on health within and between countries. In order to advance health equity as a trade policy goal, greater understanding is needed of how different actors frame their interests in order to shape government priorities, thus helping to identify competing agendas across policy communities.

This paper reports on a study of how policy actors framed their interests for the Trans Pacific Partnership agreement. We analysed 88 submissions made by industry actors, not for profit organisations, unions, researchers and individual citizens to the Australian government during treaty negotiations. We show that policy actors’ ideas of the purpose of trade agreements are shaped by competing underlying assumptions of the role of the state, market and society. We identify three primary framings: a dominant neoliberal market frame, and counter frames for the public interest and state sovereignty. Our analysis highlights the potential enabling and constraining impact of policy frames for health equity. In particular, the current dominant market framing largely excludes the social determinants of health and health equity. We argue that advocacy needs to tackle head on the underlying assumptions of market framings in order to open up space for the social. We identify successful examples of health framing for equity as well as opportunities for engagement with ‘non-traditional’ allies on shared issues of concern.

Cite the publication as

https://doi.org/10.1080/09581596.2018.1509059

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Confronting the formula feeding epidemic in a new era of trade and investment liberalisation

Author/s (editor/s):

Smith, J
Galtry, J
Salmon, L

Publication year:

2014

Publication type:

Journal article

Find this publication at:
http://australianpe.wix.com/japehome#!jape-73/c1vr8

Abstract:

Breastfeeding is rarely seen as an economic policy issue. Many view the idea of placing a dollar value on mothers’ milk as repugnant. Breastfeeding cannot be framed as simply an economic relationship. It is a complex, physiological, emotional and social relationship between mother and child, intricately related to the nature of the society, community and family in which they live. Furthermore, the ‘costs’ and ‘benefits’ of breastfeeding fall both on individuals and on society as a whole. Yet in a world where not valuing something in dollar terms means it is not valued at all, this economic invisibility can have major consequences for the ‘market’ for mother’s milk, for infant and maternal health and wellbeing, and for appropriate public policy.

Cite the publication as

Smith, J., J. Galtry and L. Salmon (2014). Confronting the formula feeding epidemic in a new era of trade and investment liberalisation. Journal of Australian Political Economy 73: 132-171.

Trade Policy and Public Health

community gardening_attribute to College of Ag on flickr

Author/s (editor/s):

Sharon Friel
Libby Hattersley
Ruth Townsend

Publication year:

2015

Publication type:

Journal article

Find this publication at:
Annual Review of Public Health website

Trade policy influences health equity outcomes through the distribution of power, money, and resources between and within countries writes RegNet Director Sharon Friel together with ANU colleagues Libby Hattersley and Ruth Townsend, in their new article ‘Trade Policy and Public Health’ published this month in the The Annual Review of Public Health.

Cite the publication as

Friel, S, L Hattersley and R Townsend (2015) ‘Trade Policy and Public Health’ Annual Review of Public Health, vol. 36: 325-344.

Updated:  10 August 2017/Responsible Officer:  Director, RegNet/Page Contact:  Director, RegNet