Indigenous Australia

Submission to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs Inquiry into ‘The growing presence of inauthentic Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 'style' art and craft products and merchandise for sale across Australia’

Author/s (editor/s):

Altman, Jon

Publication year:

2018

Publication type:

Submission

This Committee looks to inquire into and report on the growing presence of inauthentic Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ‘style’ art and craft products and merchandise for sale across Australia. It is the perception of ‘a growing presence’ that appears to have caught the attention of the Minister for Indigenous affairs when referring this issue for attention. If it is indeed the case that inauthentic (or fake) Indigenous art sales are growing then there is a distinct possibility that the economic wellbeing of those Indigenous Australians that are dependent on this sector for cash income will be undermined; and that the cultural integrity of Indigenous arts generally will be jeopardised.

On equity grounds alone it is unchallengeable, in my view, that Indigenous Australians should benefit from their intangible property rights in cultural assets; and have the right to see these presented in the market with integrity. It is also unchallengeable that producers or retailers who behave unscrupulously or illegally and who might extract excessive economic rent (profit) from the sale of inauthentic Indigenous arts and crafts products and merchandise should be stopped and potentially prosecuted and penalised.

But the question of what is authentic Indigenous art is a deeply complex issue that has troubled stakeholders in the Indigenous arts sector, and especially the manufactured tourist art sector on which this Inquiry focuses, since its emergence alongside Australian tourism 50 years ago. However, it is extremely difficult to accurately assess the prevalence of this problem and so to develop regulations that can realistically address it.

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Submission to the Australian Government Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet

Author/s (editor/s):

Jon Altman

Publication year:

2018

Publication type:

Submission

In this submission to the Australian Government Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet on their discussion paper Remote Employment and Participation, Professor Altman explains why the Community Development Program (CDP) won’t work and what other challenges it’ll create.

View the full submission in the attachment below.

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Submission to Senate Select Committee Inquiry into the Future of Work and Workers

mechanical automation

Author/s (editor/s):

Jon Altman; Francis Markham

Publication year:

2018

Publication type:

Government and community sector reports

This Senate Select Committee Inquiry on the Future of Work and Workers examines the impact of technological and other change on the future of work and workers in Australia.

In this submission, the authors draw attention to the risk that mainstream employment will decline as automatable jobs are lost. They argue that even in the best-case scenario in which new jobs replace automated jobs, there is a risk that the skills and experience that new jobs require will not match those of the unemployed, meaning that a large proportion of the population will be unemployed and unable to be employed in new jobs. They highlight the potential disproprtionate impact upon one section of Australian society, Indigenous peoples, who are already in deep ‘employment’ difficulty.

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Submission to House of Representatives Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs Inquiry: The growing presence of inauthentic Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ‘style’ art and craft products and merchandise for sale across Australia

Author/s (editor/s):

Jon Altman

Publication year:

2017

Publication type:

Government and community sector reports

In this submission to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs, Professor Altman explains his concerns about the increasing presence of inauthentic Indigenous ‘style’ artwork and how it can damage Indigenous culture.

This submission looks into the inauthentic selling of Indigenous ‘style’ artwork and looks into the many different channels through which non Indigenous people are able to sell Indigenous art without the permission of the Indigenous artists. It also briefly mentions the Katter Bill 2017 in relation to the exploitation of Indigenous culture and also focuses on the Fake Art Harms Culture campaign.

View the full submission in the attachment below.

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Updated:  10 August 2017/Responsible Officer:  Director, RegNet/Page Contact:  Director, RegNet