history

Bills of rights in Australia: History, politics and law

Author/s (editor/s):

Byrnes, Andrew
Charlesworth, Hilary
Mckinnon, Gabrielle

Publication year:

2009

Publication type:

Book

Find this publication at:
https://www.unswpress.com.au/isbn/9781921410178.htm

We accept the universal right to live in freedom and without oppression, but are our human rights adequately protected by Australian law? Arguments about the need for a bill of rights in Australia have simmered for fifty years. While attempts to introduce a national bill of rights have failed, recently the states and territories have taken on a pioneering role with statutory bills. Bills of Rights in Australia, written by the leading experts in the field, examines the arguments for and against greater protection of human rights. Original and timely, it examines the emerging evidence of the impact of these uniquely Australian bills of rights.

Cite the publication as

Byrnes, Andrew, Hilary Charlesworth, Gabrielle McKinnon, 2009. Bills of rights in Australia: History, politics and law. Australia, Sydney: UNSW Press Ltd.

The empire of civilization: The evolution of an imperial idea

Author/s (editor/s):

Bowden, Brett

Publication year:

2009

Publication type:

Book

Find this publication at:
http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/E/bo6206919.html

The term ‘civilization’ comes with considerable baggage, dichotomizing people, cultures, and histories as ‘civilized’—or not. While the idea of civilization has been deployed throughout history to justify all manner of interventions and sociopolitical engineering, few scholars have stopped to consider what the concept actually means. Here, Brett Bowden examines how the idea of civilization has informed our thinking about international relations over the course of ten centuries.

Cite the publication as

Bowden, Brett, 2009. The empire of civilization: The evolution of an imperial idea. Chicago:University of Chicago Press.

Civilization - Critical concepts in political science, volume 1: The origins and meaning of civilization

Author/s (editor/s):

Bowden, Brett

Publication year:

2009

Publication type:

Book

Find this publication at:
http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415469654/

Especially since the end of the Cold War, the concept of ‘civilization’ has been frequently deployed by those who seek to describe and explain the world in which we live. The events of 11 September 2001, and the subsequent ‘war on terror’, have further elevated the concept’s use in the discourse of politics and international relations. There has, for instance, been feverish speculation and increasingly heated rhetoric about struggles ‘for civilization’ or a possible ‘clash of civilizations’, particularly between the West and the Islamic world. The term is used both to describe—and to cast value-laden judgements about—people, places, and events. It is often misinterpreted and misapplied, with sometimes dangerous consequences.In response to the revival and misuse of ‘civilization’, this new four-volume collection from Routledge Major Works meets the need for an authoritative reference work to make sense of a vast and growing scholarly literature. It brings together canonical and the best cutting-edge research to provide a comprehensive overview of the origins, contested meanings, contextual applications, and general history of this critical concept.Volume I (‘The Origins and Meaning of Civilization’) is made up of the best work from a distinguished line-up of political scientists, philosophers, historians, sociologists, and linguists. It outlines the origins of the concept and its many and disputed meanings. This first volume establishes the foundations on which much of the analysis included in the three subsequent volumes is based.

Cite the publication as

Bowden, Brett, 2009. Civilization - Critical concepts in political science, volume 1: The origins and meaning of civilization. United Kingdom: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.

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