criminology

The recidivism of homicide offenders in WA

Prison fence

Author/s (editor/s):

Rod Broadhurst, Australian National University
Ross Maller, Australian National University
Max Maller, Curtin University of Technology
Brigitte Bouhours, University of Western Australia

Publication year:

2017

Publication type:

Journal article

Find this publication at:
View publication here on Sage website

Popular perceptions about the recidivism of homicide offenders are contradictory, varying from one extreme – that such offenders rarely commit further violent offences – to the opposite, where it is thought that they remain at a high risk of serious reoffending.

The present study draws on the records of 1088 persons arrested in Western Australia over the period 1984–2005 for domestic murders and other types of homicides (robbery and sexual murder), including attempted murder, conspiracy to murder, manslaughter (unintentional homicide) and driving causing death. Our database provides up to 22 years follow-up time (for those arrested in 1984) and accounts critically for the first and any subsequent arrests, if they occur.

Of the 1088 persons, only 3 were subsequently arrested and charged with a homicide offence event in the follow-up period. Among those arrested for a murder and subsequently released, we estimate a probability of 0.66 (accounting for censoring) of being rearrested for another offence of any type. The corresponding probabilities for those originally arrested for manslaughter or for driving causing death were equal, at 0.43. A dynamic analysis of the longitudinal data by survival analysis techniques is used to reliably estimate these probabilities. Having a prior record increased the risk of re-arrest; for example male non-Aboriginals arrested for murder with at least one prior arrest have an estimated probability of 0.72 of being rearrested for another offence of any type. Their estimated probability of being rearrested for another serious offence was 0.33.

These findings should be of interest to courts and correctional agencies in assessing risk at various stages of the administration of criminal justice.

Lessons from Gretley: Mindful leadership and the law

Author/s (editor/s):

Hopkins, Andrew

Publication year:

2007

Publication type:

Book

Find this publication at:
http://www.cch.com.au/au/onlinestore/ProductDetails.aspx?PageTitle=Lessons-from-...

Following on from the highly respected Lessons from Longford comes Lessons from Gretley, exploring the 1996 Gretley Mine disaster in NSW and its OHS implications.Lessons from Gretley describes the 2004/05 conviction and fining of two mine managers in NSW following the mine disaster at Gretley near Newcastle in 1996 and discusses whether the law was unfair to these managers. The book also examines the impact of the Gretley prosecution on the industry, using interviews with a small sample of mine managers. Hopkins then proposes the controversial view that effective OHS law must hold the top corporate leaders responsible when something goes seriously wrong, regardless of whether they were personally at fault.

Cite the publication as

Hopkins, Andrew, 2007. Lessons from Gretley: Mindful leadership and the law. 1st ed. CCH Australia Ltd.

The Cambridge handbook of Australian criminology

Author/s (editor/s):

Grabosky, Peter
Graycar, Adam

Publication year:

2002

Publication type:

Book

Find this publication at:
http://www.cambridge.org/aus/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521818452

As a unique work of reference, The Cambridge Handbook of Australian Criminology covers the broad range of contemporary and historical subjects of criminology, combining statistical and narrative analyses. The book provides the most up-to-date figures and facts, traces historical trends in Australian crime and criminal justice, and comprehensively covers the key contemporary issues in Australian criminology. Including valuable crime statistics compiled by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, this book is the complete companion to Australian criminology, the single most important resource for Australian criminology and criminal justice.

Cite the publication as

Grabosky, Peter and Adam Graycar, 2002. The Cambridge handbook of Australian criminology. United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.

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