Australia

The structural and institutional exclusion of refugees in Australia

Author/s (editor/s):

Ibolya (Ibi) Losoncz

Publication year:

2018

Publication type:

Book chapter

Australia has been involved in the UNHCR resettlement program since 1977 and is one of the top three resettlement countries in the world. Despite considerable experience and policy and program efforts, humanitarian migrants experience lower economic and social integration than other immigrants. This paper examines how social structures and institutional responses and practices play part to these outcomes. Drawing on data from an ethnographic study with recently settled South Sudanese refugees, and a longitudinal survey of humanitarian migrants in Australia, the chapter demonstrates that the main reason for this poor outcome is a lack of accessible pathways to refugee migrants.

Cite the publication as

Losoncz, I. (2018) The structural and institutional exclusion of refugees in Australia. In A. Garnier, L. Jubilut and K. Sandvik (Eds.) Refugee Resettlement: Power, Politics and Humanitarian Governance. New York: Berghahn Books, 139-158.

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From leaders to majority: A frontrunner paradox in built-sanchenvironmental climate governance experimentation?

Author/s (editor/s):

Jeroen van der Heijden

Publication year:

2018

Publication type:

Journal article

This paper seeks to better understand the possible paradox of frontrunners in experimental climate governance. This paradox refers to the situation where frontrunners are required to push boundaries in terms of developing governance innovations and to experiment with these, but where, at the same time, a too strong focus on frontrunners may result in a situation where lessons from these experiments and the innovations developed do not resonate with the majority. In such a situation, an innovation may not be capable of being scaled up or of being transferred to another context. This paper draws lessons from a series of nine experimental and innovative governance instruments for low-carbon building development and transformation in Australia. It points out that for these instruments the frontrunners paradox provides a partial explanation as to why they have not yet been able to scale up from a small group of industry leaders to the large majority.

Cite the publication as

Jeroen van der Heijden (2018) “From leaders to majority: A frontrunner paradox in built-sanchenvironment climate governance experimentation?”, Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, 61(8), 1383-1401.

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Common Enemies: Crime, Policy, and Politics in Australia-Indonesia Relations

Author/s (editor/s):

Michael McKenzie

Publication year:

2018

Publication type:

Book

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Common Enemies: Crime, Policy, and Politics in Australia-Indonesia Relations

Over the last two decades, Australia and Indonesia have built a remarkable partnership in the fight against terrorism and other transnational crimes. Common Enemies: Crime, Policy, and Politics in Australia-Indonesia Relations is the first in-depth study of this partnership, examining both its successes and its failures.

Drawing on over 100 interviews and extensive archival material, the book tells the inside story of the joint police investigation into the 2002 terrorist bombings in Bali, the extradition of Indonesian corruption fugitive Adrian Kiki Ariawan, the public campaigns in support of Australians detained in Indonesia for drug trafficking, and the 2013 spying scandal that led to a freeze in cooperation.

It also investigates many cases that never made the headlines in an effort to understand the conditions that promote criminal justice cooperation between these two very different countries. The book reveals a tension between parochial politics and policy ambition at the heart of the bilateral relationship, and explores how politicians, bureaucrats, and private actors animate this tension.

It also considers how various ‘wars on crime’ since the 1970s have shaped the relationship, and the importance of reciprocity in maintaining the relationship. Based on this analysis, it identifies strategies for enhancing cross-border cooperation to combat crime. The mix of engaging case studies and novel theorising in Common Enemies will appeal to both practitioners and scholars of transnational policing, international relations, regulation, and global governance.

Closing the Gap Refresh

Closing the Gap Refresh- Public Discussion Paper

Author/s (editor/s):

Jon Altman

Publication year:

2018

Publication type:

Government and community sector reports

Find this publication at:
Jon Altman- Closing the Gap Refresh submission

It’s been ten years since Closing the Gap began. Improving outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples continues to be a priority for all Australian governments. But we need to do better. We need to work in genuine partnership with Indigenous Australians.

Professor Jon Altman contributes a submission to the Closing the Gap Refresh. This submission along with information about the Refresh can be found on the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet website.

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