What is social about justice? Inclusive identity and group values as the basis of the justice motive

Author/s (editor/s):

Wenzel, Michael

Publication year:

2002

Publication type:

Journal article

Find this publication at:
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

Three studies tested the claim that the justice motive is based on commitment to the perceived values of the “primary category” of potential recipients of an allocation. In Study 1, participants who identified more strongly with their group regarded a member who represented the group’s strengths as more entitled to a common profit. In Study 2, participants judged their own entitlement versus that of a member who represented the group’s strengths. Members who identified more strongly with their group were less likely to display self-interest in their judgments. In Study 3, participants judged the entitlement of an in-group member representing out-group strengths versus an out-group member representing in-group strengths. When identification with the primary category (including in-group and out-group) was strong, members who identified more strongly with their in-group viewed the out-group member representing in-group values as more deserving.

Cite the publication as

Wenzel, Michael (2002) 'What is social about justice? Inclusive identity and group values as the basis of the justice motive', Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 38(3): 205-218.

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