John Braithwaite on the limits of responsive regulation

Escalation of sanctions and a tough enforcement peak to a regulatory pyramid are key features of responsive regulation. In this video John Braithwaite, one of the founders of the regulatory pyramid discusses how people power can work within the pyramid to regulate business misconduct, crime and war.

Escalation of sanctions and a tough enforcement peak to a regulatory pyramid are key features of responsive regulation. In this video John Braithwaite, one of the founders of the regulatory pyramid discusses how people power can work within the pyramid to regulate business misconduct, crime and war.

Biography

John Braithwaite is a Distinguished Professor, Australian Research Council Federation Fellow and Founder of RegNet (the Regulatory Institutions Network) at the Australian National University. John has been active in social movement politics around these and other ideas for 40 years in Australia and internationally. In the past he has worked on a variety of areas of business regulation and on the crime problem. His best known work is on the ideas of responsive regulation and restorative justice. His most recent book is Regulatory Capitalism: How it works, ideas for making it work better (2008).

He is now undertaking a 20-year comparative project called ‘Peacebuilding Compared’, with Hilary Charlesworth, Valerie Braithwaite and Kate Macfarlane. Publications from this project include the co-authored Pillars and Shadows: Statebuilding as peacebuilding in Solomon Islands (ANU E Press: 2010); Reconciliation and Architectures of Commitment: Sequencing peace in Bougainville (ANU E Press: 2010); and Anomie and Violence: Non-truth and reconciliation in Indonesian peacebuilding (ANU E Press: 2010).

Updated:  10 August 2017/Responsible Officer:  Director, RegNet/Page Contact:  Director, RegNet