Book launch - Climate Change and the Health of the Nations

Event details

Other

Date & time

Tuesday 07 February 2017
5.00pm–7.00pm

Venue

The Auditorium, China in the World Building (188), Fellows Lane, ANU
ANU Canberra

Speaker

Norman Swan (ABC Health Report), Alistair Woodward (University of Auckland), Kristie Ebi (University of Washington) & Richard Denniss (The Australia Institute)

Contacts

NCEPH

Join us for the launch of Tony McMichael’s last book, completed by Alistair Woodward and Cameron Muir, and published by Oxford University Press.

The message of this masterful book from the late Professor Tony McMichael is that in facing climate change, we must put aside our presumptions about humans dominating nature. History shows that human populations have always been vulnerable to changes in the climate, the direct and indirect health impacts are huge, and increasingly press upon us.

Speakers: Norman Swan (ABC Health Report), Alistair Woodward (University of Auckland), Kristie Ebi (University of Washington) and Richard Denniss (The Australia Institute) will discuss the book at the launch.

Panel discussion 5-6 pm, drinks 6-7 pm.

Please book via Eventbrite https://www.eventbrite.com/e/launch-of-tony-mcmichaels-last-book-tickets...

Reviews of the book:

Tony McMichael clarifies our thoughts about climate change by shifting the focus from the physics of what’s happening in the oceans and atmosphere to the long term consequences for human health.
Peter Doherty, Melbourne University.

This scholarly book by Tony McMichael on the historical interplay between climate, human activity and health is his last magnum opus; I hope that politicians read it! Fiona Stanley, University of Western Australia.

The greatest risks of climate change may well be those it poses to human health. McMichael helps us face the future by understanding the past.
Sir David King, UK Foreign Secretary’s Special Representative for Climate Change

Updated:  12 February 2016/Responsible Officer:  Director, RegNet/Page Contact:  Director, RegNet