24
Jan
2018

Civil Society Hearing on Therapeutic Goods Amendment Bill

Katinka Day, Choice; Allan Asher, Access2; Ken Harvey, Monash University; Michael Moore, Public Heal

A civil society hearing on the Therapeutic Goods Amendment (2017 Measures No. 1) Bill

Australian Parliament

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06
Feb
2018

Adventures in cybercrime and crypto-market research

Roderic Broadhurst, David Lord, Julian Slater

How easy is it to become a cybercrime victim? How safe and easy is it to purchase illicit products on the internet? The ANU Cybercrime Observatory will tackle these questions and discuss their recent work on email scams and darknet crypto-markets. The panel will discuss feasible options for combating crypto-markets and other on-line market forms.

Woman with cyber images all around her

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15
Feb
2018

Development in the Philippines: Ambisyon Natin 2040 & the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program

Desiree Joy Narvaez & Christopher Cabuay

Double billed Philippine Forum Series Event with NEDA Policy Advisor Desiree Joy Narvaez and ANU PhD Candidate Christopher Cabuay.

Desiree will speak on Ambisyon Natin 2040. Chris will speak on the efficacy of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program

» read more

20
Feb
2018

Refugees and the labour market: Institutional dynamics in comparative perspective

Adele Garnier

Across industrialised countries, refugees’ labour market participation remains low. This seminar will explore the relevance of the local policy environment, and of non-governmental organisations in providing labour market support. It will compare the experiences of refugees in the province of Quebec in Canada and in Brussels, Belgium.

Refugees walking

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22
Feb
2018

Managing the practice of writing

Terry Halliday

Writing is central to the academic vocation. It is also one of the most difficult elements of our work. How do we manage it? This session uses one scholar’s practices as a springboard for a roundtable discussion on what works, why and how. This event is designed for PhD students and early career researchers.

Word idea cut out in book

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27
Feb
2018

Global lawmakers: International organisations in the crafting of world markets

Terence C. Halliday

Globalisation of law and markets has become highly controversial. Terence Halliday’s new book Global Lawmakers reveals how the United Nations makes commercial law for the world, and who comes out ahead. Terence will launch the book at this in conversation event alongside several experts in the field.

World

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01
Mar
2018

Governing decarbonization: Conceptualizing and catalyzing political pathways

Hon Prof Matthew Hoffmann

There is no longer a single focus or locus of global climate action. In this talk, Prof Hoffmann discusses a way to conceive of the multilevel governance challenge and politics of decarbonization and an empirical strategy for exploring how a diverse range of decarbonization initiatives can catalyze transformation.

World from space

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13
Mar
2018

When is industry rule-making responsive? Some lessons from the Australian telecommunications sector

Karen Lee

Regulatory scholars and others have long maintained that it is beneficial if industry rule-making is ‘responsive’ to the ‘practices and norms’ of all interested parties. Moreover, better-targeted and more reasonable rules are believed to increase the probability that industry will comply with them. However, there remains a lack of clarity about what responsiveness means in a rule-making context, and we still know surprisingly little about the mechanisms that are needed to activate and sustain responsive industry rule-making. This seminar explores these issues drawing on three case studies in the Australian telecommunications sector.

Satellite Dish

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21
Mar
2018

Redress

Various

How can we approach redress for mass atrocities across time and space? A range of scholarly disciplines have sought to explore notions of redress but rarely do they engage in sustained dialogue about how we might think more creatively about redress.

In this series of events, scholars from the fields of anthropology, criminology, geography, law and political science will present their own current research while seeking to build a shared language around redress and the international.

» read more

21
Mar
2018

Masterclass: Gender-just peace and transitional justice

Professor Annika Björkdahl

Transitions from war to peace hold potential to transform gender relations. This lecture/seminar will critically examine how transitional justice mechanisms may contribute to the building of a gender-just peace in societies emerging from violent conflicts.

Abstract

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21
Mar
2018

Researching redress: reflections on methods and methodology

Alex Jeffrey, Sara Kendall and Ilana Feldman. Facilitator: Rachel Hughes.

Irus Braverman writes that ‘the potential for […] reflections on our highly routinized ways of working cannot be overstated’, adding that ‘one’s choice of methodology is hardly marginal or technical [rather] it is probably the most significant component of our work, the substrate for establishing our knowledge of the world’ (Braverman 2014).

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22
Mar
2018

Redress and the ethics of the international: Legalities, histories, geographies

Various

In the wake of genocide and mass harm, international criminal justice offers a global ideal of justice. But what does this mean?.

» read more

27
Mar
2018

The reintegration of children affected by armed conflict: Conceptualisation and measurement

Luke Bearup and Ibi Losoncz

The three pillars in conflict reconstruction are Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR). This seminar critically examines the current approaches to evaluating the reintegration of children affected by armed conflict. These tend to be technocratic, psychological, or individualistic in emphasis. This contrasts with the growing recognition, within the literature, of the central role of approval and acceptance at the local level.

Aftermath of fighting

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28
Mar
2018

How can Myanmar regulate its fiscal and monetary corruption?

Naing Ko Ko

Today, corruption in Myanmar is not only a major problem for the country’s economic and political reforms, but also a threat to the country’s national security and economic development. It can be seen at all levels of the state’s regulatory agencies, from the national institutions down to the regional and local administrative levels. Myanmar deserves a credible, responsible and accountable government that represents the interests of the nation and its future generations.

Myanmar Parliament

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28
Mar
2018

Innovations in development cooperation: Lessons from the Coalitions for Change Program in the Philippines

Prof Paul Hutchcroft

Established in 2012, the Coalitions for Change (CfC) program is the centrepiece of the Manila partnership between the Australian aid program and The Asia Foundation. As it has evolved, CfC has sought to innovate flexible approaches to development cooperation that focus upon the goal of promoting transformative change. Unlike more traditional approaches, commonly focused on technical assistance and capacity building while working through long-term formal partnerships, the hallmark of CfC is its willingness to attempt nimble manoeuvres in complex political environments.

» read more

06
Apr
2018

Walls between States

Marie-Eve Loiselle

Walls have been used for centuries as a form of protection against a variety of threats, real or perceived. They have been built to defend against thefts, invasions and threats to cultural identity.

Today more than 70 walls or barriers stand or are being planned by States to prevent entry to their territory. This is despite the perception that we are living in a time where borders are losing their relevance in the face of the necessities of a globalised world.

In this final presentation of her PhD thesis, Marie-Eve explores the link between law and walls, looking in particular at the wall between the US and Mexico.

Black and white wall

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10
Apr
2018

A failed revolution: how bureaucrats fight and dance with the silos

Ryan Wong

The UN Sustainable Development Goals agenda has passionately pushed for more policy integration. For as long as bureaucracy has existed, ministerial silos have been preventing integration across sectors. The problem is so intractable that the prominent scholar Guy Peters characterizes policy coordination as the ‘holy grail of public administration’.

I ask the question of how can we facilitate integration in bureaucratic institutions that are interest-obsessed, idea-focussed, power-hungry, and attention-deficient.

Business man

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12
Apr
2018

Is International Law International?

Dr Anthea Roberts (RegNet) James Larson, Chief Legal Officer (DFAT) David Olson, King & Wood Mal

Challenging the myth of international law’s universality, this award winning book is a must read in today’s world of changing geopolitical power.

» read more

13
Apr
2018

In pursuit of progress: Narratives of development on a Philippine island

Dr Hannah Bulloch

The idea of development has been scrutinised as a ‘Western’ metaphor ordering global difference, and as a banner under which diverse schemes for societal improvement find legitimacy and common purpose. But how is development assimilated into the worldviews of the people on the receiving end?

In Pursuit of Progress explores myths, meanings and practices of ‘development’, ‘progress’ and ‘modernisation’ on the Philippine island of Siquijor. It asks how such meta-narratives are entangled in people’s identities and life trajectories. How do they shape people’s understandings of their histories, their place in the world, and their dreams for the future?

The book contributes to debates in anthropology, sociology, and development studies regarding how discourses of development act on local and global power relations.

» read more

17
Apr
2018

To what extent do policies in Australia consider the social determinants of health and health equity?

Fran Baum

This presentation will draw on findings from two ARC Discovery projects which have examined the extent to which Australian public policies incorporate consideration of the social determinants of health and health equity (SDH/HE).

Stethoscope

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19
Apr
2018

China: Powerhouse and Resistor of Restorative Justice Reform

Yan Zhang

In this research, I am looking into a series of restorative justice (RJ) reforms promoted by Chinese government within the last decade. Specifically, as it investigates both the restorative programs that are universally implemented in Chinese criminal justice system (i.e. people’s mediation, public order mediation and criminal reconciliation), and an indigenous mediation (De Gu mediation) particularly practiced by the Yi People in an ethnic region of southwest China.

» read more

24
Apr
2018

How will shale gas development in Mexico be smart regulated?

José Alberto Hernández Ibarzábal

Can shale gas development in Mexico, a wicked problem, be smart regulated? A qualitative analysis of the regulatory setting, challenges and perspectives.

Lands from above

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01
May
2018

Cascades of Violence

John Braithwaite and Bina D’Costa

War and crime are cascade phenomena. War cascades across space and time to more war; crime to more crime; crime cascades to war; and war to crime. As a result, war and crime become complex phenomena.

Barbed wire fence

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03
May
2018

Encounters between Strangers. Law and Jewish Identity

Mareike Riedel

Jewish practices have come increasingly under legal and political pressure across several countries of the West. Iceland is currently debating a ban on male circumcision and in 2017, the Belgian region of Wallonia joined other countries such as Sweden, New Zealand, and Switzerland by drafting a law which bans the kosher and halal slaughter of animals for meat production

Father and Son

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22
May
2018

Re-imagining the Rule of Law

Martin Krygier

This paper argues for a reimagining that will avoid the ineffectiveness, helplessness before change, complicity in subversion, and irrelevance, of conventional understandings. The approach begins by asking about the point of the rule of law, what it might be good for, and then advocates moving from there to contingent and variable answers to questions about how to get there. We must also be prepared to amend both questions and answers, indeed re-imagine them quite radically, where they mislead or do not lead far enough. So much so, that to further the ends of the rule of law, we might need to leave conventional imaginings of it far behind.

» read more

25
May
2018

Philippines Update 2018: Contesting the Philippines

Secretary Benjamin E.

As the Duterte administration marks its two-year anniversary, the Philippines is undergoing a series of internal and external shocks that go to the heart of its constitution and its legal and social policy contract with its citizens.

» read more

25
May
2018

Dancing across the disciplinary silos

Ryan Wong and Deb Cleland

Interdisciplinarity is a practice - it takes practice. At the AMICIE forum, we invite you to co-design an interdisciplinary conference with us. We have fun exercises for practising your interdisciplinary skills.

» read more

25
May
2018

Upstreamers & downstreamers: Promoting investment in First Peoples through the creation of exclusive rights

Virginia Marshall

Join Dr Virginia Marshall, the ANU inaugural Indigenous Post-Doctoral Fellow for the ANU Reconciliation Week Lecture, ‘Upstreamers & downstreamers: Promoting investment in First Peoples through the creation of exclusive rights’.

» read more

29
May
2018

Greening the EBRD through its Accountability Mechanism?

Associate Professor Susan Park, University of Sydney

Emerging from the rubble of the Cold War, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) was, until 2016, the newest of the big Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs.

Bank towers

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31
May
2018

Organised Crime Research Forum 2018

Various

The Australian Institute of Criminology has once again teamed up with the Australian National University to host the 2018 Organised Crime Research Forum on 31 May – 1 June.

» read more

07
Jun
2018

How can public health authorities reconcile their regulatory and catalyst roles in creating healthier food environments?

Dr Chantal Blouin

Dr Chantal Blouin is an international expert on health governance, especially for NCDs, and was a panel member of the Lancet – University of Oslo Commission on Global Governance for Health.

» read more

07
Jun
2018

Restorative inquiries and hope: learning and healing in universities, deaths in custody and institutional settings

Professor Jennifer Llewellyn

Restorative inquiries create a shared space to develop solutions, to make changes and to bring hope for the future. They can also give rise to resistance, which needs to be understood and addressed. Jennifer will discuss some of these complexities in the context of her experiences in these inquiries.

» read more

08
Jun
2018

Conversations on the use of Restorative Practices in Human Services – some international perspectives

Professor Jennifer Llewellyn and Emeritus Professor Gale Burford

At this Workshop, Jennifer and Gale will provide some starting thoughts for a rich conversation about how commitment to restorative practices could build relationships based on trust and meaningful engagement

» read more

12
Jun
2018

Health Equity as a Governance Challenge (Mid Term Review)

Sora Lee

Drawing from PhD research investigating on how health equity is operationalized at multi-level governance, across multiple sectors, author suggests governing the ideational space of intersectoralism may bring about important changes.

» read more

19
Jun
2018

Rethinking Regulation: Lawyer Regulation in the South Pacific Region (Thesis Proposal Review)

David Naylor

This thesis project will examine lawyer regulation in Fiji, Kiribati and Vanuatu. It will explore how lawyers’ conduct is influenced by state and non-state structures and seek to identify elements that are important to locally relevant and effective lawyer regulation.

» read more

22
Jun
2018

A Certain Light: A Memoir of Family, Loss and Hope

Cynthia Banham

Cynthia Banham will discuss her recent family memoir, A Certain Light, which she wrote after completing her PhD at RegNet. It tells the difficult stories of survival of three generations of her family: her grandfather’s experiences as an Italian Military Internee in Germany, her mother’s struggles as a young migrant in Australia, and her own, as a journalist injured in a plane crash ten years ago.

» read more

12
Jul
2018

Cosmopolitan Pluralism, Authoritarian Nationalism, and the Future of Liberal Governance

Paul Schiff Berman, Professor of Law, The George Washington University Law School

In this era of populist revolt around the world, we need a full-throated defense of cosmopolitan pluralism: a scheme of governance that recognizes the importance of inter-locking networks of communication and cooperation, but also respect for local variation.

Paul Schiff Berman, The George Washington University Law School

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17
Jul
2018

Sharing breastmilk in Australia: economies of defiance? (Mid Term Review)

Libby Salmon

‘Wet-nursing’ has been transformed by modern technologies into milk banks in hospitals, exchanges of breastmilk in the community via social media and trade in human milk products, raising questions about safety, ethics and competition for supply. This research investigates how collective acts to share milk by mothers to address individual feeding problems are shaped by the regulatory regime for infant feeding in Australia, including biological, legal, social and market rules.

» read more

24
Jul
2018

Papua New Guinea’s Review of the Organic Law on National and Local Level Government Elections

Dr. Eric Kwa

Dr. Eric Kwa, CEO of the Papua New Guinea Constitutional and Law Reform Commission (CLRC) will present to the Australian National University RegNet School of Regulation and Global Governance, an overview of the scope of the review of Papua New Guinea’s Organic law on National and Local Level Government, related electoral laws, processes and systems and Electoral Systems by the Government of Papua New Guinea.

» read more

26
Jul
2018

Codification and Creation of Community & Customary Laws in the South Pacific and Beyond

Various

Codification and Creation of Community & Customary Laws in the South Pacific and Beyond Conference was hosted at The Australian National University 26-27 July 2018.

ANU Codification Conference 2018

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27
Jul
2018

Declining Food Security in a Philippine Oil Palm Frontier: The Changing Role of Cooperatives

Dr Wolfram Dressler

Agricultural cooperatives’ long-held redistributive function- one of moral economy and poverty alleviation- has changed dramatically as they emerge as core brokers for agro-industrial development in the so-called ‘green economy’.

» read more

08
Aug
2018

Just Interests: Victims, Citizens and the Potential for Justice

Robyn Holder

Just Interests: Victims, Citizens and the Potential for Justice contributes to extended conversations about the idea of justice – who has it, who doesn’t and what it means in the everyday setting of criminal justice. It challenges the usual representation of people victimized by violence only as victims, and re-positions them as members of a political community. Departing from conventional approaches that see victims as a problem for law to contain, Robyn Holder draws on democratic principles of inclusion and deliberation to argue for the unique opportunity of criminal justice to enlist the capacity of citizens to rise to the demands of justice in their ordinary lives.

» read more

14
Aug
2018

Criminal Justice and Regulation Revisited: Essays in Honour of Peter Grabosky

Russell Brewer, Lennon Chang, John Braithwaite, Rod Broadhurst

This edited volume celebrates the significant contributions of Peter Grabosky to the field of Criminology, and in particular, his work developing and adapting regulatory theory to the study of policing and security.

» read more

21
Aug
2018

The role of Geographic Information Services (GIS) in governance and regulation and CartoGIS Services supporting research and education

Kay Dancey and Sandy Potter

This seminar will examine how governments are using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and mapping to facilitate and support regulation. It will examine the GIS and mapping resources available to academics in CAP through CartoGIS Services. Finally, it will explore the ways that GIS can be used to engage with issues and answer questions at a range of spatial and temporal scales.

» read more

23
Aug
2018

The Great Unhinging: The Erosion of Rule of Law in the Philippines

Marites Vitug

Under President Duterte, the rule of law is fast eroding, as the three pillars of his strongman rule show. First is his centerpiece program, the war on drugs, the rock on which his strongman rule stands. Annihilating suspected drug users will not solve the problem of illicit drug use. But that is not the point of Duterte’s war. It is meant to intimidate and sow fear in the public, a means of control. More than 4,000 have been killed in what the police claim are  “legitimate” operations. Cases questioning the constitutionality of the drug war are pending in the Supreme Court which is dominated by pro-Duterte justices.

» read more

28
Aug
2018

The influence and consequences of ‘securitizing’ pandemic prevention and response in Australia (Mid Term Review)

Tim Vines

In this mid-term review, Tim will present preliminary findings from his research into the securitisation of infectious diseases in Australian law-making and the response to the 2014-16 outbreak of Ebola in West Africa and pandemic influenza. The presentation will highlight early insights from Tim’s analysis of legislative history and interviews with senior officials, life-science researchers and politicians.

» read more

31
Aug
2018

Is there collaborative governance in the health sector in Timor-Leste? (Mid Term Review)

Belinda Lawton

Is there collaborative governance in the health sector in Timor-Leste? In this mid-term review, Belinda Lawton will discuss her preliminary findings after three field trips to Timor-Leste. The presentation will highlight early insights from Belinda’s analysis of family planning policy in Timor, from interviews across the government and non-government sectors and observation of debate around the proposed policy changes in 2017.

» read more

04
Sep
2018

From theory to reality: an academic’s encounter with the global health policy machine

Sharon Friel, Professor of Health Equity and Director School of Regulation and Global Governance (Re

Theory and empirical evidence tells us that health inequities arise because of a toxic combination of poor social policies, unfair economic arrangements and bad politics. These, in turn, affect the circumstances in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age. Why then, 10 years after the World Health Organisation’s Commission on the Social Determinants of Health made recommendations about what could be done to address these issues has very little changed?

» read more

11
Sep
2018

Caring for Country: #Not a Lifestyle Choice

Eugene Bargo

From 10 - 14 September 2018, the ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) will host the University’s first Garrurru Visiting Scholar, Mr Eugene Bargo, under the CAP Garrurru Visting Fellowship Program. As part of the visitation, RegNet will host a special student-focused seminar and to offer ANU students an opportunity to engage with Mr Bargo and to hear about his experience, perspective and ideas on Aboriginal education and empowerment. We encourage all ANU Indigenous and non-Indigenous students to attend and engage in this event.

» read more

18
Sep
2018

Open Research: Creating better engagement and impact

Elke Dawson

Elke Dawson is the Manager, Open Research within Scholarly Information Services which also encompasses the Library, ANU Press and University Archives and Records.

» read more

25
Sep
2018

Civil Oversight of Prisons: Divergent Regulatory Models & Voices from Inside

Carol Lawson

What happens when a regulatory system breaks with ‘best practice’? This talk presents the results of an empirical study of civil oversight systems found in prisons in Japan and the ACT, one hewing to Eurocentric human rights norms, while the other charts its own path. The study asks how each system works in practice, and what impact each has, using data gathered from over 2500 ‘insider’ actors: prisoners, civil overseers, and corrections officers.

» read more

Updated:  10 August 2017/Responsible Officer:  Director, RegNet/Page Contact:  Director, RegNet