29
Jan
2019

Strength-based governance and culture change in UK Prisons

David Best

The presentation will be a summary of my new book “The Social Contagion of Hope” which examines the ways that communities can support inclusion and reintegration of marginalised groups such as offenders and drug users. The focus is on developing a method to promote and sustain active community engagement in creating pathways to community assets and resources

» read more

05
Feb
2019

“Being Affluent One Drinks Wine”: Wine counterfeiting in mainland China

Anqi Shen

In this seminar, Anqi Shen used wine counterfeiting in China as a case study to discuss: the definitional issue of product counterfeiting; the scope, scale and organisation of the counterfeiting business; and the policing of product piracy. Rather than focusing on the protection of intellectual property rights, there was emphasis placed on public health concerns with regard to dangerous counterfeit goods to attract public and law enforcement attention.

» read more

12
Feb
2019

Contagion and Containment of Violence: the Case of Sorcery Accusations and Related Violence in Enga Province, Papua New Guinea

Miranda Forsyth

How and why do particular forms of violence spread across populations during particular periods? This question is interrogated through an empirical account of the current epidemic of violence against individuals accused of practising sorcery in the Enga province of the Papua New Guinean Highlands.

» read more

19
Feb
2019

Judging the Church: Legal Systems and Accountability for Clerical Sexual Abuse of Children

Meredith Edelman

Meredith Edelman will make her final thesis presentation on “Judging the Church: Legal Systems and Accountability for Clerical Sexual Abuse of Children. Her work considers four different legal systems in two Catholic dioceses: the diocese of Ballarat in Victoria, Australia, and the diocese of Gallup in Northern New Mexico and Arizona in the United States. Each diocese has seen a relatively high number of victims come forward with allegations of abuse, and a range of different legal systems used to respond to those claims. The purpose of the thesis is to compare the legal systems. Meredith is supervised by Professor John Braithwaite.

» read more

26
Feb
2019

Why and how Mexico said no to shale gas development and Australia said yes? The implications and challenges moving forward

José Alberto Hernández Ibarzába

Mexico and Australia have, respectively, the sixth and seventh unproved technically recoverable wet shale gas resources. Thus, what happens with these resources matters for their societies. It is also relevant for regional trade. And from a global perspective considering the impact of shale resources development on global warming. Whereas Mexico has stopped fracking, Australia is poised for large scale development of shale gas. Why and how, and the implications and challenges, to be presented.

» read more

26
Feb
2019

Updates on socio-economic agenda and key legislative priorities of the Duterte administration:2019-2022

Undersecretary Gerard Salapantan

This presentation will highlight laws passed during the last three years (2016-18) of the Duterte’s administration in line with his 10-point socio-economic agenda including any variations thereof. The Presidential Legislative Liaison Office (PLLO), as the executive’s legislative arm in coordination with the Philippine Congress, monitors and tracks these priorities with various departments and government agencies. Further, PLLO will present the key legislative priorities of this administration for the remaining three years (2019-2022)

» read more

27
Feb
2019

Roundtable with Dr Cathy Wilkinson: Environmental Regulatory Strategy

Dr Cathy Wilkinson CEO, EPA Victoria

Join colleagues from the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) in an intimate roundtable event with Dr Cathy Wilkinson, CEO of EPA Victoria. There will be a brief presentation by Dr Wilkinson on environmental regulation strategy followed by Q&A.

» read more

28
Feb
2019

Analysis of three Australian State-level Public Policies: Stakeholders’ Perspective

Kuntal Goswami

This research examines how various groups of stakeholders perceived Tasmania Together (TT), South Australia’s Strategic Plan (SASP), and Western Australia’s State Sustainability Strategy as an over-arching holistic sustainability public policy. It also investigates their opinions on the apparent political implications as well as the benefits of these policies.

» read more

14
Mar
2019

Towards reinvigorating Australian foreign policy studies

Professor Valerie M Hudson, Mark Kenny & Professor Jacqui True

The 2017 Foreign Policy White Paper highlighted how forces of change are challenging the rules-based global order upon which Australia’s security and prosperity has depended since the Second World War. At this moment of uncertainty in Australian foreign policy, how well-equipped are Australian academics to contribute to navigating a way forward? Asking this question invites reflection on the state of foreign policy studies in Australia as well as the extent to which the study and practice of foreign policy are (or could, or even should be) connected.

» read more

21
Mar
2019

Protection from Refuge

Kate Ogg

In this seminar, Kate presents her doctoral research on the role courts play in one of the most significant problems facing the international refugee protection regime: that the places in which people seek refuge are often as dangerous and bleak as the conditions they fled. Kate’s case studies across four continents indicate that legal decision-makers have, at times, played a powerful role in facilitating refugees’ journeys in search of sanctuary but have ultimately compounded the difficulties inherent in finding genuine refuge.

» read more

22
Mar
2019

The Bangsamoro plebiscite: fault lines, connectors, and the role of civil society

Georgi Engelbrecht & Yasmira Moner

After some ups and downs during the late Aquino and present Duterte era, the Bangsamoro Organic Law (BOL) was finalized in 2018, followed with the ratification of the law by the people on 21 January 2019 and 6 February 2019. Whilst the first plebiscite already did result in the establishment of the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (BARMM) and the city of the Cotabato voted “Yes” in a surprising twist of events, the island town of Isabela City did not join the BARMM. Moreover, the province of Sulu voted for the No as well, albeit the island remains highly divisive. The 6 February plebiscite conducted in various barangays and towns of North Cotabato and the province of Lanao del Norte – both arguably arteries of the peace process, posed a reality check on the readiness of Mindanao’s tri-peoples to fully embrace the BOL as a key instrument for peace. The talk will focus on conduct, outcome and assessment of both plebiscites as well as potential scenarios for the future.

» read more

26
Mar
2019

Compensation under Investment Treaties – as if Host Interests Mattered

Emma Aisbett

In response to the growing crisis of legitimacy of the international investment treaty regime, we propose a new liability and compensation rule based on a law & economics understanding of the function of these treaties. While our rule does not always achieve a global first-best, it does ensure that participation in treaties brings benefits for both “host” and “source” states. This Pareto-improving property contrasts to the existing regime or previous canonical compensation rules.

» read more

26
Mar
2019

Health governance in strengthening the referral system to reduce maternal mortality in local communities of Manila

Erlidia Llamas-Clark

Maternal mortality in the Philippines continues to be a significant public health concern even in metropolitan urban centres. Annually, 20-25 maternal deaths occur in Manila City despite the availability and access to significant health resources in public hospitals and maternity facilities. This ‘silent disaster’ needs to be addressed through a range of maternal health services, policies and programs. The untimely deaths of women during pregnancy is a tragedy for families and a social capital and economic productivity loss to the city and the country.

» read more

02
Apr
2019

Can the authenticity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art be regulated?

Jon Altman

In August 2017 the Minister for Indigenous Affairs instructed the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs to inquire and report on the growing presence of inauthentic Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander style merchandise for sale across Australia; and to provide options for its restriction. In December 2018 the Committee’s report was completed. In this seminar I critically engage with the Committee’s recommendations and ask ‘Can the authenticity of Indigenous art be effectively regulated?

» read more

04
Apr
2019

Addressing commercial influence and power imbalance in intersectoral governance

Dori Patay

The noncommunicable disease (NCD) crisis in the Pacific is in close correlation with the increased demand and supply of unhealthy commodities in the region. Yet the governments of Pacific Island Countries struggle with regulating these goods, because commercial influence fragments, captures and limits policy makers. In her Mid-Term Review presentation, Dori Patay will present the early findings of her PhD research and will demonstrate the ways the persuading power of health can be strengthened in intersectoral policy making.

» read more

16
Apr
2019

Escaping the Fractal Carbon Trap

Matthew Hoffmann

This talk examines the analytic and practical impact of recasting the governance challenge of decarbonisation in terms of fractal systems. I explore the nature and politics of fractal carbon lock-in and discuss the preliminary results of a six-year project exploring diverse initiatives that seek to disrupt carbon lock-in and usher in decarbonisation.

» read more

29
Apr
2019

Rethinking International Investment Governance: Principles for the 21st Century

Emma Aisbett, Jonathan Bonnitcha, Anthea Roberts and Susan Sell

Foreign Direct Investment and investment governance have become flash points for controversies over environmental protection, public health and policy autonomy. Battles between states and corporations over policies promoting renewable energy, reducing tobacco use, and keeping drugs affordable have been protracted and expensive. Rethinking International Investment Governance offers an exploration of how the system could be reimagined and reformed to better align with sustainable development goals.

» read more

30
Apr
2019

Places of justice in Australian environmental law: Lessons from Victorian and NSW coal-mining towns

Brad Jessup

This talk will discuss the emergence of a concept of environmental justice in Victorian government policy and law reform following the Hazelwood coalmine fire in the Latrobe Valley and in the jurisprudence of the chief justice of the New South Wales Land and Environment Court in relation to proposed coal-mining activities in the Hunter Valley.

» read more

01
May
2019

Solving the Climate & Health Crisis

Various

The ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) and the ANU Climate Change Institute (CCI) are joining forces to host this half day symposium to tackle the current climate and health crisis. Led by Professor Sharon Friel (Director, RegNet), the symposium will bring together experts from academia, civil society and government, with a focus on public health, climate science, regulatory governance, and public policy. The symposium will include a Radio National Big Ideas panel discussion hosted by Paul Barclay, and will conclude with a launch of Sharon Friel’s new book, Climate Change and the People’s Health (OUP), and networking drinks.

worradirek/Shutterstock https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/farm-jasmine-ricetheir-field-on-woman-718167154

» read more

01
May
2019

Climate Change and the People's Health (Book Launch)

Various

Climate Change and the People’s Health is part of the Oxford University Press series “Small Books Big Ideas in Population Health”. The book focuses on climate change’s contribution to health inequities and introduces the concept of ‘consumptagenic systems’ – a new framework for understanding the common drivers of climate change, social inequity and poor health – how they interact and amplify one another. A key feature of the book is not on the problem but on pathways forward, using systems approaches to understand what can be done to mitigate future harm, and drawing on political science to understand the processes involved in moving this agenda forward.

» read more

07
May
2019

Covert online "stings": What are the legal issues?

Gregor Urbas

This presentation explores the use of covert investigative techniques by law enforcement, principally in the area of online child sexual exploitation, as well as the legal position of service providers and individuals. How do online “sting” operations overcome legal restrictions? Can private actors use similar deceptive techniques? What role do service providers have, given increasing regulatory pressures to participate in the detection of harmful online content?

» read more

14
May
2019

The new geoeconomic world order

Anthea Roberts

How are economics and security colliding in the US-China tech/trade war? How will this reshape the field of international economic law?

» read more

21
May
2019

Sympathy for the devil: State collaboration with criminal organisations

Peter Grabosky

Governments have long relied on non-state entities to assist in the implementation of public policy. They have also engaged criminal actors to this end. This presentation will provide examples of such collaboration. It will discuss strategic considerations giving rise to these engagements, pitfalls that beset them, and ethical considerations that might inform the decision to form state-criminal partnerships.

» read more

28
May
2019

Applying the social identity approach to understand social conflict: A wind energy case study

Rebecca Colvin

Social conflict about land use change is regularly dysfunctional; people focus on defeating their opponents at the expense of securing a workable solution to how we should manage our land. Wind energy development has been especially prone to dysfunctional social conflict. In this talk, we explore how social identity helps to explain dysfunctional social conflict and consider its promise as part of a solution.

» read more

30
May
2019

Organised Crime Research Forum 2019

Various

The Australian Institute of Criminology has once again teamed up with the Australian National University to host the 2019 Organised Crime Research Forum on 30 - 31 May. The primary purpose of the forum is to help build Australia’s research capacity focused on organised crime by bringing together academics to discuss their work in this area.

» read more

04
Jun
2019

Underdogs, Boosters and Regulators

Stepan Wood

This talk argues that the unlikely success of organised labour in the drafting of the ISO 26000 social responsibility guide illuminates the interactive dynamics of regulatory legitimation and enrolment, suggesting a generalisable triadic strategy in which a regulatory underdog exploits legitimation differentials between a legitimacy-poor regulator and a legitimacy-rich booster to advance its interests in transnational governance.

» read more

11
Jun
2019

Reflections on Interdisciplinary Research

Various

In this panel leading scholars from the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) will reflect on the nature of interdisciplinary research. Bringing together insights from a plurality of methods applied across a range of important policy domains, including health, criminology and the environment, the panel will consider: What is interdisciplinary research? How do you do it? When does it work? And, when does it not?

» read more

18
Jun
2019

Populism, fake news and policy implementation

Michael Moore

“Fake news” is not new. However, with the advent of social media the ability to circulate “fake news” has had a major impact on decision making nationally and internationally. The seminar will examine examples from Australia and overseas where misinformation has had an impact on policy outcomes and will examine how public health advocates can counter this type of populism.

» read more

20
Jun
2019

Taking a people-centre approach to delivering on SDG 16.3: Report of the Task Force on Justice

David Steven

Join us for a discussion with David Steven, Associate Director of the Center for International Cooperation at New York University and Head of the Secretariat of the Task Force on Justice – an initiative of the Pathfinders for Peaceful, Just and Inclusive Societies. David will discuss the findings of the Task Force’s report on taking a different approach to delivering on SDG 16.3 by putting people at the centre of justice systems and justice at the heart of sustainable development. The final Task Force report is to be presented at the High-Level Political Forum on SDG 16 at the United Nations in July.

» read more

25
Jun
2019

Is there Impunity in Chile?

Javier Andrés Contreras Olivares

In this seminar, Javier explains the main reasons why, almost 30 years after the return of democracy in Chile, there seems to be a level of impunity negatively affecting the accountability cases for the massive violations of human rights perpetrated during the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet (September 11th, 1973 – March 10th, 1990).

» read more

02
Jul
2019

Bougainville’s autonomy arrangements: implementation dilemmas

Gordon Peake

This seminar assesses implementation of the autonomy provisions of the Bougainville Peace Agreement.

» read more

09
Jul
2019

Politics of nanotechnology innovation in Asia-Pacific: tiny technology meets transnational governance

Kirsten Rodine-Hardy

Nanotechnology, the tiny technology that allows matter to be manipulated at the atomic level, has entered the complex global market. Over 60 countries created new nanotechnology programs, yet few countries created nanotechnology regulations. How have these patterns in nanotechnology innovation emerged? This paper analyses how politics, through transnational networks and national regimes, shape nano innovation in the Asia-Pacific region.

» read more

09
Jul
2019

Averting climate catastrophe: extinction rebellion, business & people power

Neil Gunningham, Carolyn Hendriks and Lachlan James

In 2018 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned that we have only 12 years at current global greenhouse gas emissions rates before our chances of limiting global warming to 1.5C are seriously at risk. So we have a brief window in which to act, and to do so with enough force, commitment and ambition to achieve a rapid decarbonisation of the global economy. But how might such a fundamental shift - from business as usual to transformative change - be achieved?

» read more

10
Jul
2019

Manila Conference 2019: Pathways to Peace and Development in the Philippines

H.E Steven J. Robinson AO

The Manila Conference 2019 seeks to chart the peace and development pathways of the Philippines in the next three years and beyond.

The conference will draw from a wide range of perspectives as well as provide a platform for academic and policy discussion between Philippine and Australian academics, policymakers and practitioners on important economic, political and security issues.

» read more

12
Jul
2019

Book launch: From Aquino II to Duterte (2010-2018)

Editors and contributors

This volume focuses on four critical areas- politics and governance, economic governance, Mindanao peace process, and international relations - to illustrate continuities or discontinuities in policies and governance of institutions to explain the dynamics of change in the Philippines.

» read more

16
Jul
2019

Regulatory stewardship: will it strengthen Aotearoa/New Zealand’s social license to regulate?

Jeroen van der Heijden

Since 2013, Regulatory Stewardship is a statutory obligation for government departments in Aotearoa/New Zealand. This seminar explores the history, current state of affairs, and future of regulatory stewardship as a means for the Aotearoa/New Zealand government to strengthen its social license to regulate.

» read more

23
Jul
2019

Cascades of crises: great power collaboration in prevention

John Braithwaite

The greatest danger to great powers is not each other; it is crises enabled by failures to collaborate with each other to counter threats from third sources. Climate crises, economic crises, and security crises are the big three threats to the survival of our grandchildren. These crisis risks are increasingly interrelated. The best way to prevent tomorrow’s crises of all three kinds is to prevent today’s crises of all three kinds. 10 points are advanced on how global civil society might encourage this.

» read more

30
Jul
2019

How effective are police ‘hacks’ of 'Darknet' opioid markets

Rod Broadhurst, Matt Ball and Harry Trivedi

This seminar will examine the impact of transnational police Operation SaboTOR (March 2019) on opioid supply on Darknet Markets. Such operations attempt to undermine trust among illicit market actors. Previous research shows displacement to new or non-targeted Darknet Markets is likely rather than deterrence. We observe the impact of SaboTOR on the availability of opioids, in particular fentanyl and the countermeasures used by market vendors.

» read more

06
Aug
2019

Influencing nutrition policy in Australia

Dr Katherine Cullerton

This seminar will explore the power of interest groups and their influence on public health nutrition policy in Australia, the barriers advocates face and the enablers they can use to influence public and political will, and future steps in this body of research.

» read more

07
Aug
2019

LRSJ/RegNet justice careers seminar: working against the death penalty

Zainab Mahboob, Sara Kowal

LRSJ will be holding a light lunch for students to meet and chat with two of the world’s leading advocates against capital punishment, Zainab Mahboob and Sara Kowal.

Law books_Image by witwiccan from Pixabay.jpg

» read more

07
Aug
2019

LRSJ/RegNet Seminar: litigating against the death penalty – the Justice Project, Pakistan

Zainab Mahboob, Professor Donald Rothwell, Dr. Mai Sato

Join Zainab Mahboob, Head of Legal at the Justice Project Pakistan, as she shares her experiences of litigating against the death penalty in Pakistan. Together with Professor Donald Rothwell, Professor of International Law at the ANU College of Law, Zainab will explore Pakistan’s use of the death penalty, which is amongst the harshest in the world, accounting for 13% of global executions and 14% of worldwide death sentences. Dr. Mai Sato will be chairing this event.

Law books_Image by witwiccan from Pixabay.jpg

» read more

08
Aug
2019

Influencing policy making in the engagement and impact era

Emeritus Professor Jon Altman

This highly interactive workshop will focus on the role of academics in the policy making process and the changing nature of the role of parliamentary and departmental inquiries over time.

» read more

13
Aug
2019

Reasons to Doubt: Wrongful Convictions and the Criminal Cases Review Commission

Mai Sato, Rachel Dioso-Villa, Gregory Stratton

This book club is hosted by the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), ANU. Dr Mai Sato will introduce the key findings from her co-authored book (with Carolyn Hoyle) on the Criminal Cases Review Commission. Dr Rachel Dioso-Villa (Griffith University) and Dr Gregory Stratton (RMIT University) will act as commentators.

» read more

20
Aug
2019

China in Global Governance of E-commerce

Dr Wenting Cheng

Cross-border e-commerce has surged in recent years and China has been a big player in this area. This presentation explores how a China-led agenda on the global governance of e-commerce has emerged. In addition to this state-led agenda, the corporate-led initiative on e-commerce by Alibaba will shed light on the role of China in global governance.

» read more

22
Aug
2019

Next Steps for Paid Parental Leave: Assessing and advancing leave policy in Australia

Ásdís Aðalbjörg Arnalds, Prof. Marian Baird, Dr Belinda Townsend, Dr Liana Leach

The Australian Government Paid Parental Scheme was announced in 2009 to increase mother’s employment while supporting maternal and child health and gender equality. Ten years since this historic decision, research from the NHRMC funded CRE in the Social Determinants of Health Equity underscores how this policy has enabled more equitable and health promoting parental leave as well as workforce participation. It is now time to reflect on the impact of this social policy and what remains to be done. This event aims to provoke debate and explore new ideas on the next steps for paid parental leave.

» read more

27
Aug
2019

Three Perspectives on Energy Research

Dr Christian Downie, Dr José Alberto Hernández Ibarzábal, Michelle Lyons, David Gourley

In this panel three researchers affiliated with the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) and the ANU’s Grand Challenge: Zero Carbon Emissions in the Asia Pacific project will provide a snapshot of their research and reflect on the emerging energy challenges faced by Australia and Mexico.

Natural gas infrastructure - Bilfinger SE (Flickr)_resized.jpg

» read more

03
Sep
2019

Shaping society through stories: Narrative as regulation

Desmond Manderson, Myra Mentari Abubakar, Miranda Forsyth, Ashley Schram

Conversations series 2019: Narration and renarration as regulation
Fairy tales, movies, art, the media – they all convey stories that produce, and reproduce, the norms and values of a society within a given time and space. What did the stories of your childhood teach you about virtues and vices, masculinity and femininity, heroes and villains? What do the daily newspapers, the evening news, or the latest tweets say about personal responsibility or collective action, about what we as a society should value or fear? How do these stories seek to regulate our behaviour?

Image: Joybot (Flickr) (http:::ift.tt:2FvGx84)

» read more

05
Sep
2019

Responsive law and legal systems: what the problem of clerical child sexual abuse teaches about the law’s capacity to respond to complex problems

Meredith Edelman

This seminar is Meredith Edelman’s final thesis presentation. Meredith will discuss her analysis of canon law, tort law, bankruptcy law, and the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse using Nonet and Selznick’s typology of law.

Image: church - Lachlan Gowen (unsplash)

» read more

10
Sep
2019

Changing the story: Narration and framing in regulation and governance

Professor Anthea Roberts, Elizabeth Boulton, Mark Kenny, Associate Professor Miranda Forsyth

Conversations series 2019: Narration and renarration as regulation
This panel explores the role of narratives in framing how problems are understood and their consequent impact on how policies and regulation are developed, received, opposed and ignored. We ask: How and why do narratives have such powerful roles? To what extent can policy-making be characterised as story-telling, and how does this work to both empower and silence different voices and possibilities? What are the implications of these insights for regulation and governance and for the role of scholars in this process?

Image: Joybot (Flickr) (http:::ift.tt:2FvGx84)

» read more

11
Sep
2019

Institutional Disrespect

Dr Ibolya (Ibi) Losoncz, Atem Atem, Karen Middleton

Whose responsibility is it to address the disrespect felt by immigrants and other marginalised groups in their dealings with government institutions? Join our panel, Karen Middleton, Atem Atem, and Ibi Losoncz, author of Institutional Disrespect, as they discuss the experiences of refugee migrants at the hands of the state, the question of responsibility, and the necessary work to overcome ongoing injustice.

fence-refugees welcome_Image by kalhh from Pixabay.jpg

» read more

17
Sep
2019

Narration and re-narration through multiple genres and creative media

Jono Lineen, Dr Mai Sato, Dr Graeme Smith, Dr Gordon Peake

Conversations series 2019: Narration and renarration as regulation

This seminar brings together four academics who have used documentaries, podcasts and commercial non-fiction to showcase their work, and found that they were able to reach wider audiences than through conventional research products alone. Gordon Peake curates a discussion with Jono Lineen, Mai Sato and Graeme Smith about the role of the creative arts in narration and re-narration.

How can story-telling fit within the conventions of academic/policy writing? How do the forms and media through which stories are narrated influence what regulatory impact they have?

» read more

23
Sep
2019

Tell Your Story workshop with editor Nadine Davidoff

Nadine Davidoff

This full-day workshop guides academics in the transition from academic prose to writing for a non-specialist readership.

Image: Micah Boswell (Unsplash)

» read more

24
Sep
2019

Changing the story book: Re-narration and re-storying as pathways to transformation

Kanika Samuels-Wortley, Aileen Marwung Walsh, Dr Deb Cleland, Associate Professor Kate Henne

Conversations series 2019: Narration and renarration as regulation

Re-storying is a powerful strategy that has been used in different contexts, particularly to re-centre marginalised or silenced voices. Re-storying dominant narratives can challenge tacit knowledge and taken-for-granted beliefs. What, then, is the potential for re-narration to lead to transformations in regulation and governance?

Image: Joybot (Flickr) (http:::ift.tt:2FvGx84)

» read more

26
Sep
2019

Mid-term review seminar: Organising, mobilising, strategising: transforming policy and practice around HIV and illicit drugs

Daniel Reeders

Emerging interstitial movements are constantly negotiating regulatory space. They enter gaps created by policy, funding and political constraints on established players. Establishing their own domains of influence depends on organising actors, mobilising realities, managing uncertainty and strategising for social change. This mid-term review seminar introduces two movements seeking to transform policy and practice around HIV and illicit drugs.

Palani Narayanan_Daniel Reeders seminar_Organising, mobilising, strategising_2.jpg

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01
Oct
2019

Lifestyles of the electric vehicle driver

Dr Lee White

This seminar explores the role of lifestyle factors in willingness to adopt electric vehicles. Are people unwilling to adopt electric vehicles because these simply won’t serve their needs, or are other factors at play? Our findings have implications for where to target regulation, governance, and financial investments to support electric vehicle adoption.

carsharing-electric car_Image by andreas160578 from Pixabay.jpg

» read more

08
Oct
2019

Women4twenty24: women’s political representation in India and Indonesia

Dr Tanya Jakimow

National elections in India and Indonesia held earlier this year are a starting point to examine how women are faring within their respective electoral systems. The lessons from 2019 are not heartening, pointing to the enduring nature of barriers to political participation, as well as new challenges arising from contemporary political conditions. Dr Jakimow will identify comparative lessons from these two different socio-political contexts, and tentatively map out an agenda of research and practical action to increase the number of women elected in India and Indonesia in elections due in 2024.

vote-Wokandapix from Pixabay.jpg

» read more

15
Oct
2019

Mid-term review seminar: Peace, justice and strong institutions: regulating lawyers in Pacific Island countries

David Naylor

This mid-term review seminar presents some preliminary findings from field work undertaken in Kiribati, Fiji and Vanuatu on influencers of lawyer conduct in practice and implications for regulation and governance. It will also identify and discuss some of the policy challenges this research poses for regional law makers in legal education, regulation and professional discipline.

meeting_Image by rawpixel from Pixabay.jpg

» read more

Updated:  10 August 2017/Responsible Officer:  Director, RegNet/Page Contact:  Director, RegNet