April 2018

06
Apr
2018

Walls between States

Marie-Eve Loiselle

Walls have been used for centuries as a form of protection against a variety of threats, real or perceived. They have been built to defend against thefts, invasions and threats to cultural identity.

Today more than 70 walls or barriers stand or are being planned by States to prevent entry to their territory. This is despite the perception that we are living in a time where borders are losing their relevance in the face of the necessities of a globalised world.

In this final presentation of her PhD thesis, Marie-Eve explores the link between law and walls, looking in particular at the wall between the US and Mexico.

Black and white wall

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10
Apr
2018

A failed revolution: how bureaucrats fight and dance with the silos

Ryan Wong

The UN Sustainable Development Goals agenda has passionately pushed for more policy integration. For as long as bureaucracy has existed, ministerial silos have been preventing integration across sectors. The problem is so intractable that the prominent scholar Guy Peters characterizes policy coordination as the ‘holy grail of public administration’.

I ask the question of how can we facilitate integration in bureaucratic institutions that are interest-obsessed, idea-focussed, power-hungry, and attention-deficient.

Business man

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12
Apr
2018

Is International Law International?

Dr Anthea Roberts (RegNet) James Larson, Chief Legal Officer (DFAT) David Olson, King & Wood Mal

Challenging the myth of international law’s universality, this award winning book is a must read in today’s world of changing geopolitical power.

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13
Apr
2018

In pursuit of progress: Narratives of development on a Philippine island

Dr Hannah Bulloch

The idea of development has been scrutinised as a ‘Western’ metaphor ordering global difference, and as a banner under which diverse schemes for societal improvement find legitimacy and common purpose. But how is development assimilated into the worldviews of the people on the receiving end?

In Pursuit of Progress explores myths, meanings and practices of ‘development’, ‘progress’ and ‘modernisation’ on the Philippine island of Siquijor. It asks how such meta-narratives are entangled in people’s identities and life trajectories. How do they shape people’s understandings of their histories, their place in the world, and their dreams for the future?

The book contributes to debates in anthropology, sociology, and development studies regarding how discourses of development act on local and global power relations.

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17
Apr
2018

To what extent do policies in Australia consider the social determinants of health and health equity?

Fran Baum

This presentation will draw on findings from two ARC Discovery projects which have examined the extent to which Australian public policies incorporate consideration of the social determinants of health and health equity (SDH/HE).

Stethoscope

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19
Apr
2018

China: Powerhouse and Resistor of Restorative Justice Reform

Yan Zhang

In this research, I am looking into a series of restorative justice (RJ) reforms promoted by Chinese government within the last decade. Specifically, as it investigates both the restorative programs that are universally implemented in Chinese criminal justice system (i.e. people’s mediation, public order mediation and criminal reconciliation), and an indigenous mediation (De Gu mediation) particularly practiced by the Yi People in an ethnic region of southwest China.

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24
Apr
2018

How will shale gas development in Mexico be smart regulated?

José Alberto Hernández Ibarzábal

Can shale gas development in Mexico, a wicked problem, be smart regulated? A qualitative analysis of the regulatory setting, challenges and perspectives.

Lands from above

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Updated:  10 August 2017/Responsible Officer:  Director, RegNet/Page Contact:  Director, RegNet