March 2018

01
Mar
2018

Governing decarbonization: Conceptualizing and catalyzing political pathways

Hon Prof Matthew Hoffmann

There is no longer a single focus or locus of global climate action. In this talk, Prof Hoffmann discusses a way to conceive of the multilevel governance challenge and politics of decarbonization and an empirical strategy for exploring how a diverse range of decarbonization initiatives can catalyze transformation.

World from space

» read more

13
Mar
2018

When is industry rule-making responsive? Some lessons from the Australian telecommunications sector

Karen Lee

Regulatory scholars and others have long maintained that it is beneficial if industry rule-making is ‘responsive’ to the ‘practices and norms’ of all interested parties. Moreover, better-targeted and more reasonable rules are believed to increase the probability that industry will comply with them. However, there remains a lack of clarity about what responsiveness means in a rule-making context, and we still know surprisingly little about the mechanisms that are needed to activate and sustain responsive industry rule-making. This seminar explores these issues drawing on three case studies in the Australian telecommunications sector.

Satellite Dish

» read more

21
Mar
2018

Masterclass: Gender-just peace and transitional justice

Professor Annika Björkdahl

Transitions from war to peace hold potential to transform gender relations. This lecture/seminar will critically examine how transitional justice mechanisms may contribute to the building of a gender-just peace in societies emerging from violent conflicts.

Abstract

» read more

21
Mar
2018

Redress

Various

How can we approach redress for mass atrocities across time and space? A range of scholarly disciplines have sought to explore notions of redress but rarely do they engage in sustained dialogue about how we might think more creatively about redress.

In this series of events, scholars from the fields of anthropology, criminology, geography, law and political science will present their own current research while seeking to build a shared language around redress and the international.

» read more

21
Mar
2018

Researching redress: reflections on methods and methodology

Alex Jeffrey, Sara Kendall and Ilana Feldman. Facilitator: Rachel Hughes.

Irus Braverman writes that ‘the potential for […] reflections on our highly routinized ways of working cannot be overstated’, adding that ‘one’s choice of methodology is hardly marginal or technical [rather] it is probably the most significant component of our work, the substrate for establishing our knowledge of the world’ (Braverman 2014).

» read more

22
Mar
2018

Redress and the ethics of the international: Legalities, histories, geographies

Various

In the wake of genocide and mass harm, international criminal justice offers a global ideal of justice. But what does this mean?.

» read more

27
Mar
2018

The reintegration of children affected by armed conflict: Conceptualisation and measurement

Luke Bearup and Ibi Losoncz

The three pillars in conflict reconstruction are Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR). This seminar critically examines the current approaches to evaluating the reintegration of children affected by armed conflict. These tend to be technocratic, psychological, or individualistic in emphasis. This contrasts with the growing recognition, within the literature, of the central role of approval and acceptance at the local level.

Aftermath of fighting

» read more

28
Mar
2018

How can Myanmar regulate its fiscal and monetary corruption?

Naing Ko Ko

Today, corruption in Myanmar is not only a major problem for the country’s economic and political reforms, but also a threat to the country’s national security and economic development. It can be seen at all levels of the state’s regulatory agencies, from the national institutions down to the regional and local administrative levels. Myanmar deserves a credible, responsible and accountable government that represents the interests of the nation and its future generations.

Myanmar Parliament

» read more

28
Mar
2018

Innovations in development cooperation: Lessons from the Coalitions for Change Program in the Philippines

Prof Paul Hutchcroft

Established in 2012, the Coalitions for Change (CfC) program is the centrepiece of the Manila partnership between the Australian aid program and The Asia Foundation. As it has evolved, CfC has sought to innovate flexible approaches to development cooperation that focus upon the goal of promoting transformative change. Unlike more traditional approaches, commonly focused on technical assistance and capacity building while working through long-term formal partnerships, the hallmark of CfC is its willingness to attempt nimble manoeuvres in complex political environments.

» read more

Updated:  10 August 2017/Responsible Officer:  Director, RegNet/Page Contact:  Director, RegNet