September 2019

03
Sep
2019

Shaping society through stories: Narrative as regulation

Desmond Manderson, Myra Mentari Abubakar, Miranda Forsyth, Ashley Schram

Conversations series 2019: Narration and renarration as regulation
Fairy tales, movies, art, the media – they all convey stories that produce, and reproduce, the norms and values of a society within a given time and space. What did the stories of your childhood teach you about virtues and vices, masculinity and femininity, heroes and villains? What do the daily newspapers, the evening news, or the latest tweets say about personal responsibility or collective action, about what we as a society should value or fear? How do these stories seek to regulate our behaviour?

Image: Joybot (Flickr) (http:::ift.tt:2FvGx84)

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05
Sep
2019

Responsive law and legal systems: what the problem of clerical child sexual abuse teaches about the law’s capacity to respond to complex problems

Meredith Edelman

This seminar is Meredith Edelman’s final thesis presentation. Meredith will discuss her analysis of canon law, tort law, bankruptcy law, and the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse using Nonet and Selznick’s typology of law.

Image: church - Lachlan Gowen (unsplash)

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10
Sep
2019

Changing the story: Narration and framing in regulation and governance

Professor Anthea Roberts, Elizabeth Boulton, Mark Kenny, Associate Professor Miranda Forsyth

Conversations series 2019: Narration and renarration as regulation
This panel explores the role of narratives in framing how problems are understood and their consequent impact on how policies and regulation are developed, received, opposed and ignored. We ask: How and why do narratives have such powerful roles? To what extent can policy-making be characterised as story-telling, and how does this work to both empower and silence different voices and possibilities? What are the implications of these insights for regulation and governance and for the role of scholars in this process?

Image: Joybot (Flickr) (http:::ift.tt:2FvGx84)

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11
Sep
2019

Institutional Disrespect

Dr Ibolya (Ibi) Losoncz, Atem Atem, Karen Middleton

Whose responsibility is it to address the disrespect felt by immigrants and other marginalised groups in their dealings with government institutions? Join our panel, Karen Middleton, Atem Atem, and Ibi Losoncz, author of Institutional Disrespect, as they discuss the experiences of refugee migrants at the hands of the state, the question of responsibility, and the necessary work to overcome ongoing injustice.

fence-refugees welcome_Image by kalhh from Pixabay.jpg

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17
Sep
2019

Narration and re-narration through multiple genres and creative media

Jono Lineen, Dr Mai Sato, Dr Graeme Smith, Dr Gordon Peake

Conversations series 2019: Narration and renarration as regulation

This seminar brings together four academics who have used documentaries, podcasts and commercial non-fiction to showcase their work, and found that they were able to reach wider audiences than through conventional research products alone. Gordon Peake curates a discussion with Jono Lineen, Mai Sato and Graeme Smith about the role of the creative arts in narration and re-narration.

How can story-telling fit within the conventions of academic/policy writing? How do the forms and media through which stories are narrated influence what regulatory impact they have?

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23
Sep
2019

Tell Your Story workshop with editor Nadine Davidoff

Nadine Davidoff

This full-day workshop guides academics in the transition from academic prose to writing for a non-specialist readership.

Image: Micah Boswell (Unsplash)

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24
Sep
2019

Changing the story book: Re-narration and re-storying as pathways to transformation

Kanika Samuels-Wortley, Aileen Marwung Walsh, Dr Deb Cleland, Associate Professor Kate Henne

Conversations series 2019: Narration and renarration as regulation

Re-storying is a powerful strategy that has been used in different contexts, particularly to re-centre marginalised or silenced voices. Re-storying dominant narratives can challenge tacit knowledge and taken-for-granted beliefs. What, then, is the potential for re-narration to lead to transformations in regulation and governance?

Image: Joybot (Flickr) (http:::ift.tt:2FvGx84)

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26
Sep
2019

Mid-term review seminar: Organising, mobilising, strategising: transforming policy and practice around HIV and illicit drugs

Daniel Reeders

Emerging interstitial movements are constantly negotiating regulatory space. They enter gaps created by policy, funding and political constraints on established players. Establishing their own domains of influence depends on organising actors, mobilising realities, managing uncertainty and strategising for social change. This mid-term review seminar introduces two movements seeking to transform policy and practice around HIV and illicit drugs.

Palani Narayanan_Daniel Reeders seminar_Organising, mobilising, strategising_2.jpg

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Updated:  10 August 2017/Responsible Officer:  Director, RegNet/Page Contact:  Director, RegNet